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Rain and Snow Becoming More Intense Less Frequent Announces White Paper

October 31, 2013

Report by DeWayne Cecil, PhD, for Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder, Sharon Kleyne, Raises Questions about Long-Term Climate Change and Human Health

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) October 31, 2013

Satellite and in-situ observation suggests changes in the long-term characteristics of precipitation at the Earth’s surface to less frequent but more intense rain and snow events. This is especially evident over land masses with the greatest human populations. That was one of the conclusions in a recent White Paper by Climatologist DeWayne Cecil, PhD, for a study team sponsored by Sharon Kleyne’s Bio Logic Aqua Research.

The study team’s objective, according to Kleyne and Cecil, is research and education regarding changes in atmospheric water content, including fresh water vapor and precipitation, and their potential and observed impacts on human health. The intent is to stimulate discussions of the impact of climatic variation with the goal of improving the ability of humans to live with and adapt to a changing atmosphere.

DeWayne Cecil, PhD, has had a distinguished career as a Climatologist in academic, government and private research settings. He has been employed as a researcher for the USGS Water Resources Discipline, the NASA Earth Observation Satellite program, Director of NOAA’a Western Region Climate Services and most recently, Chief Climatologist for Global Science and Technology, Inc. of Ashville, NC.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio-Logic Aqua Research, a fresh water and health research, education and product development center. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®, the company’s global signature product, provides a pure fresh water supplement for dry eyes and dry eyelids when the atmosphere’s water vapor and pollution content result in eye dehydration complaints. Kleyne hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

According to Cecil, the most significant observed change in the Earth’s climate, with the greatest potential human impact, is increased energy in the atmosphere. As a result of this increase, says Cecil, wet areas are becoming wetter and dry areas are becoming dryer. In the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, the climate is definitely becoming wetter, with more rain, snow, hurricanes and floods. At the same time, precipitation has decreased in China, Australia, the American Southwest and the Pacific Islands. In equatorial regions, precipitation has become increasingly variable with long periods of drought interrupted by extreme weather events.

Cecil and Kleyne attribute this increase in atmospheric energy to several factors. Generally warmer temperatures with fewer clouds increase the amount of solar energy reaching the Earth. Warmer temperatures also cause surface fresh water to gasify or evaporate at a faster rate, resulting in an increase in both atmospheric water vapor and latent energy.

The initial warming trend, according to Kleyne, may be caused by a combination of normal cyclical variations, increased air pollution in the middle and higher latitudes, and an increase in carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas. Cecil and Kleyne note that the most abundant greenhouse gas, with the greatest impact on climate, weather and temperature moderation, is water vapor, not carbon dioxide. Air pollution tends to reduce the amount of atmospheric water vapor.

According to Sharon Kleyne, reduced atmospheric water vapor, increased air pollution and higher temperatures all increase the rate of fresh water evaporation from skin and eyes. The result is widespread dehydration complaints such as dry eyes and dry skin. To counteract the dehydrating health effects of a reduced atmospheric water vapor, Kleyne stresses the importance of drinking at least eight full glasses of fresh water each day in addition to all other fluid intake.

In areas that are high risk for dehydration, Kleyne also recommends carrying a personal, portable hand-held humidifying device such as Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®. The device emits a pure, fresh water, ultra-fine mist to naturally hydrate dry eyes and supplement water lost to evaporative pressure at the body surface.

Changes in the air’s water vapor content, according to Kleyne, could explain the growing worldwide crisis in dry eye syndrome. Kleyne has long called for continued research into the relationship between atmospheric water vapor, drought and. Pollution; and dehydration of the eyes and skin.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11288731.htm


Source: prweb