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Donations Required to Finalize Development of Cancer Detecting Breath Device

November 14, 2013

Dr. Boris Gorbunov, Director and Leading Technical Scientist of Ancon Technologies announces that only $750,000 is needed to bring the company’s ground-breaking Nanoparticle Biomarker disease detection device to the next stage where it can be tested as the world’s first breath detection device to identify very early stage Cancer as well as other diseases such as Tuberculosis before they manifest into a life threatening stage.

Canterbury, Kent. United Kingdom (PRWEB) November 14, 2013

Dr. Boris Gorbunov, Director and Leading Technical Scientist of Ancon Technologies announces that only $750,000 is needed to bring the company’s ground-breaking Nanoparticle Biomarker disease detection device to the next stage where it can be tested as the world’s first breath detection device to identify very early stage Cancer as well as other diseases such as Tuberculosis before they manifest into a life threatening stage.

With 1 in 3 people predicted to be diagnosed with Cancer, the impact of this technology could be massive: by identifying diseases before they start, thousands of lives could be saved every year and at a fraction of the cost of current methods.

Company Commercial and Marketing Director, Wesley Baker says, “We believe that breath analysis is the 'holy grail' of medical diagnosis because it is inexpensive, simple to use and allows early stage identification which greatly increases quality of life and a patient’s chances of survival. If we could get individuals to donate just $10 we would be well on our way towards saving lives, that could well be your family, friends, and even associates with a device that can detect cancer early – this is our driving force, we must get this device to the world as soon as possible!”

For over 10 years, Dr. Boris Gorbunov, an internationally renowned expert in nanotechnology and nucleation with more than 150 technical R&D publications and patents, has been leading a research team to develop breakthrough Nanoparticle Biomarker Tagging (NBT) detection technology: a technology that reads biomarkers emitted from a person’s breath to detect illnesses like Cancer and Tuberculosis. Exhaled breath contains a complex mixture of molecules produced by body fluids called “biomarkers” which can be used to identify the existence diseases and conditions.

The device itself is portable laboratory in a desktop enclosure comprising several stages of manipulation of biomarkers on a molecular level. The NBT technology is based on the amplification of biomarker molecules: the device can amplify more than 1 billion times in mass allowing for a single molecule to be detected and identified.

NBT technology is far superior to all current technologies for trace compound quantification in the air: Ancon’s cutting edge device could be produced at a widely affordable cost for the medical field to use in daily clinical practice. There is a wide spectrum of diseases it could identify including, Lung Cancer, Tuberculosis, Diabetes, Bowel Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Liver Cancer and Kidney Cancer.

The company’s long term goal is to get the NBT device into local doctor’s offices, hospitals and clinics. However, to get to these stages donations are critical.

Ancon’s head office and labs are in the Innovation Centre in the cathedral city of Canterbury in the United Kingdom. The Ancon team has won numerous awards and received recognition for its innovation in Aerosols Nanotechnology Particle research.

Wesley Baker stresses that “Cancer touches all of us eventually – it could be you or someone you know and/or love. Donations will be put towards the development of this groundbreaking NBT device so that it can save uncountable lives from the perils of this ugly disease.”

To donate and help save lives go to: http://igg.me/at/defeatcancer.

For more information on Ancon Technologies go to: http://www.ancontechnologies.com.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/defeatcancer/prweb11329193.htm


Source: prweb



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