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White Paper Calls for Improved Utilization of Long Term Climate and Atmospheric Data

November 19, 2013

Satellite Data Should Be More Localized, Better Coordinated With Health Agencies Says DeWayne Cecil, PhD, in White Paper for Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder Sharon Kleyne Study Team

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) November 19, 2013

Scientists are collecting massive amounts of data on long-term weather, climate and atmospheric changes, through satellites and other remote observation technologies. This is generating debate by various professional communities worldwide on how to best apply this information to minimize the human health impact. In a recent White Paper for a Study Team sponsored by Sharon Kleyne’s Bio Logic Aqua Research, Climatologist DeWayne Cecil, PhD, noted that, “Missing in the discussion is the connection between observed climate and atmospheric changes and the availability and utilization of this information by human health communities.”

The study team’s objective, according to Kleyne and Cecil, is research and education regarding changes in atmospheric water vapor content and the influence on human health. The study team’s intent is to stimulate discussions of the effects of climatic variation with the goal of bringing together multiple professional disciplines to improve the ability of humans to live with and adapt to a changing and increasingly dehydrating atmosphere.

DeWayne Cecil, PhD, has had a distinguished career as a Climatologist in academic, government and private research settings. He has been employed as a researcher for the USGS Water Resources Discipline, the NASA Earth Observation Satellite program, Director of NOAA’a Western Region Climate Services and most recently, Chief Climatologist for Global Science and Technology, Inc. of Ashville, NC.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, which specializes in research, education, technology, and product development in the areas of fresh water, atmospheric vapor and human health. Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®, the company’s global signature product, provides a pure fresh water mist to instantly supplement the water in dehydrated eyes and skin caused by increased evaporation pressure from air pollution and diminished atmospheric water vapor content. Kleyne also hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Cecil recommended additional studies on a sub-regional scale such as small river basins, in addition to studies on a national or global scale. He suggested several areas of potential research, based on the World Health Organization’s 2012 Fact Sheet 266, “Climate Change and Health.”

Potential research Areas include:

1. A more complete understanding of the effects of surface evaporation, atmospheric water vapor and precipitation availability and their roles as transmission media to impact human health and agriculture.

2. Studies and applications focused on gaining a better understanding of the relationship between local meteorology (short term) and climate changes (long term) on air and water pollution.

3. The role of urbanization, population growth and changing demographics on water and air quality as the climate changes, and the associated vulnerability or resilience of targeted sub-populations.

4. Improvements in the understanding and prediction of the climatology of extreme events.

5. Increased application of weather and climate information through geographic information systems and risk assessment tools targeting human health, food and fresh water security.

6. Capacity building to establish skilled applied researchers and resource managers trained in integrating climate data, information, and models with human health data, information and models for decision support.

Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne both expressed deep concern over cuts in NASA’s Earth Observation Satellite program. They contend that funding should be increased, not decreased because human survival on Earth could depend on it.

References: English, et al, “Environmental health indicators of climate change for the United States,” Environmental Health Perspectives, Nov.v.117(11), 2009; Wolf, et al, “Towards a European assessment of health risk and climate change,” International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27, 2013.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11347461.htm


Source: prweb



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