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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Schwarzenegger: Bush Administration’s Global-Warming Action Bogus

July 14, 2008

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said on Sunday that any last-minute action by Bush on global warming before leaving office would be “bogus.”

The Republican Governor said on ABC’s “This Week” that any action against global warming this late in the administration would lack sincerity.  Under Schwarzenegger’s leadership, California has pushed for federal action to limit greenhouse gases, but has been unsuccessful.

“You don’t really have an effect by doing something six months before you leave office … it doesn’t sound to me believable at all. The sincerity is not there,” he said.  “If they would have done something this year, I would have thought it was bogus anyway.”

Stephen Johnson, chief of the Environmental Protection Agency, declined on Friday to take initiative on regulating greenhouse gas emissions under current laws even though the U.S. Supreme Court ruled over a year ago that the agency had the power to do so.

15 months after the Supreme Court’s ruling, bipartisan critics believe the non-action assures that the Bush administration will do little to slow-down global warming.  Johnson believes Congress should be the ones to regulate emissions through legislation.

When commenting on Johnson’s statement Schwarzenegger said, “(this) really means that basically this administration did not believe in global warming, or they did not believe that they should do anything about it since China is not doing anything about it and since India is not willing to do the same thing, so why should we do the same thing?”

Schwarzenegger believes the U.S. should be the leader in the fight against climate change. 

Last month, legislation in the Senate died that would limit greenhouse gas emissions by using a market-based cap-and-trade system.

President Bush joined other leaders at the G8 summit in Japan last week and pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2050.  Unfortunately, the pledge offered no solid plans and is open to interpretation.

Schwarzenegger said the record number of wildfires in California this summer could be partially accredited to global warming.