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Housing West of Utah Lake Gets Nay Vote, Which May Be Reversed

August 9, 2008

By Rodger L. Hardy Deseret News

PROVO — It was thumbs down for a 650-lot development west of Utah Lake recently, but county commissioners could reverse their Planning Commission when they meet Tuesday to consider the project.

Developer Cole Cannon’s West Lake Estates, a temporary name, received a mostly favorable response from the commissioners when he appealed his rejection last Tuesday to rezone 180 acres from agricultural uses to high-density residential. The site is close to the south end of Utah Lake near West Mountain.

Rezoning would precede a 12-year plan to build a new 400-acre community that would have its own recyclable gray water system. A million-gallon water tank buried in the mountain above the community would provide culinary water.

However, the county won’t provide any services, except police. A contract would have to be worked out for fire protection, Commissioner Steve White said. The closest town is Payson.

Fire hydrants would be another requirement.

A homeowners association would take care of other services or the project wouldn’t get approved, White said.

Homes built in the community could have personal windmills or solar panels to provide about half the power needed, or homeowners could purchase green credits for power that would come from hydroelectric or other wind power sources, Cannon said.

“I want (this) to be the first (self-) sustainable community in Utah County,” he said.

The development would have home density much greater than the county norm of one home for every five acres. Cannon’s average lot size is .68 of an acre. The smallest would measure 7,000 square feet and the largest estate lots would top one acre, Cannon said.

Once the community’s population reached 100 it would have to incorporate.

Issues to work through include water. The land has one well now, but more are in the approval stages, he said.

The county wants to preserve agriculture, but the site for Cannon’s project isn’t favorable to farming or grazing. It could negatively affect other farms in the area, officials said.

Once the county rezones the property it has no ordinance to enforce the development plan, White said. However, Cannon said, the zoning requirements are stringent.

The commission reviewed Cannon’s plan at a work meeting. Commissioners meet in regular session at 9 a.m. on Tuesday. Commission chambers are in the county building, 100 E. Center, Room 1400.

E-mail: rodger@desnews.com

(c) 2008 Deseret News (Salt Lake City). Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights Reserved.




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