Quantcast

Wildlands’ Laguna Terrace East Conservation Bank Open For Business

October 29, 2008

Wildlands, Inc. is pleased to announce the opening of Laguna Terrace East Conservation Bank in Sacramento County, California. The 200-acre Laguna Terrace East Conservation Bank will permanently preserve habitat for endangered and threatened vernal pool species and the state threatened Swainson’s hawk.

Conservation bank credits are available now to be purchased by the development community and public sector to fulfill obligations required under federal, state, and county regulations such as the Endangered Species Act and the California Environmental Quality Act. The new bank mitigates for vernal pool impacts within an eight-county service area including Yuba, Sutter, Placer, Sacramento, El Dorado, Amador, San Joaquin, and Calaveras Counties. For Swainson’s hawk mitigation, the bank serves portions of Sacramento, El Dorado, and San Joaquin Counties.

Vernal pools are complex miniature ecosystems that support a hardy cast of plant and animal life. In California’s Central Valley, the pools form in depressions over non-permeable soils, filling with winter rains and drying up in the summer. The plants and animals that occupy these vernal pools have adapted to the harsh extremes of the wet and dry cycles. Among these inhabitants, Laguna Terrace East Conservation Bank hosts the vernal pool fairy shrimp (Branchinecta lynchi), which is listed as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. Wildlands’ multimedia crew has recorded underwater video of the vernal pool fairy shrimp, which may be viewed on the company website.

For more information about the Laguna Terrace East Conservation Bank, please contact Jeff Mathews at (916) 435-3555.

Wildlands, a private mitigation banking firm based in Rocklin, California, has been in business since 1991. With projects and offices throughout the West Coast and Southeastern U.S., Wildlands has preserved and protected over 30,000 acres of habitat, offering wetland mitigation and species conservation credits to public and private developers.




comments powered by Disqus