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Patricia Putters In The Pacific

October 14, 2009

Tropical Depression Patricia in the Eastern Pacific Ocean has now degenerated into a remnant low pressure area over the southernmost tip of Baja California.

The circulation associated with the Patricia’s clouds and showers had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph at the time of the National Hurricane Center’s last advisory on Wednesday, October 14 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time, Patricia’s center was located just 15 miles east-southeast of Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico. That’s near 22.8 North and 109.7 West. Cabo San Lucas is the southern-most city on the Baja California.

Fortunately, Patricia’s remnants won’t hang around the southern Baja, who are still picking up after soaking rains from tropical cyclones earlier in the season. Patricia’s remnants are moving west-northwest near 6 mph and are expected to turn west and head out to sea where it will dissipate.

NASA’s Aqua satellite flew over Patricia and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm’s remnants on October 13 at 4:41 p.m. EDT. Patricia’s remnants appeared as a small round area of clouds at the southernmost tip of Baja California. Much more impressive, however was the massive storm system to the north that entered California from the Eastern Pacific.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) used satellite data to determine that Patricia had been devoid of organized deep convection (and developing thunderstorms) since 2 p.m. EDT on October 13. The NHC forecasters don’t expect Patricia to regenerate even though she’ll be moving back over open waters, because she’ll run into dry air and cooler sea surface temperatures. Those are two factors that weaken tropical cyclones. Patricia’s remnants are expected to dissipate by the weekend.

Image Caption: NASA’s AIRS instrument captured this visible image of Patricia’s remnants (bottom) on October 13 at 4:41 p.m. EDT, seen as the small round area of clouds at the southernmost tip of Baja California. Much more impressive is the massive storm system to the north that entered California from the Eastern Pacific. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

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