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International Magnesium Award for CAST’s Mark Easton

October 29, 2009

Last night at the 8th International Conference on Magnesium Alloys and Applications, Australia’s Dr Mark Easton was announced as the winner of the GKSS Magnesium Research Award. 

The GKSS Research Centre in Geesthacht initiated the award to honor innovative work by an individual researcher in the area of the science and technology of magnesium alloys.

Magnesium is a logical lightweight alternative to traditional materials, especially for automotive applications.  Magnesium is 33% lighter than aluminum and 75% lighter than cast iron, has an excellent strength to weight ratio, high shock and dent resistance and will dampen noise and vibrations significantly more than either aluminum or steel.

Dr Easton was selected from a field of applicants from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America.  According to GKSS, Dr Easton received the award because of his “important contributions to the understanding of the relationship between nuclei and grain refinement for magnesium alloys.”

“Dr Easton was involved in the development of new grain refiner for wrought alloys containing zirconium in its most effective form.  He has led teams in the development of several new alloys, predominantly for casting, and for a range of other applications. Dr Easton has provided considerable leadership in the Australian research community and globally.”

According to Dr Easton, “My passion is for doing research that spans the gap between good science and the development of real technologies.”

“Research is able to contribute to some of the important issues that face the world and humanity. One of the greatest issues is how we learn to live in a resource limited world.  I like to think that my research goes some way to addressing these issues.”

Mark Easton is a Research Program Manager with the CAST Cooperative Research Centre based at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

Dr. Easton graduated from Monash University and obtained his PhD in Materials Engineering from the University of Queensland. In 1999, he worked at Comalco Research and Technical Services in Thomastown, Victoria, Australia. From 2000-2004, he was a Research Engineer at Monash University with the CRC for CAST Metals Manufacturing (CAST). Since 2005, Dr Easton has been a Research Program Manager with the CAST at Monash University.

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