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Addex Highlights Strength Of Allosteric Modulation Technology Platform

November 12, 2010

Multiple presentations at Society for Neuroscience 2010

Allosteric modulation company Addex Pharmaceuticals (SIX:ADXN) announced today that data on a total of nine therapeutic programs will be presented during Society for Neuroscience 2010 (November 13-17, San Diego, USA), highlighting the strength of its allosteric modulation technology platform. The data being presented cover multiple receptor types and therapeutic areas, including Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, anxiety, Alzheimer’s disease and depression.

“The data generated by Addex and our partners, Ortho-McNeil-Janssen and Merck & Co., being presented at the Society for Neuroscience 2010 conference illustrate the power of our allosteric modulation product generating engine. Although the targets we are addressing have been pursued for many years with standard discovery technologies, most have proven elusive,” explained Dr. Vincent Mutel, CEO of Addex. “Our technology is allowing us to bring a new kind of chemistry to industrial drug discovery efforts and thereby improve discovery productivity, a key bottleneck hindering the pharmaceutical industry. Beyond our presentations at Society for Neuroscience this year, we have recently demonstrated our ability to expand our discovery technology beyond GPCRs, like glutamate receptors, to cover other types of cell surface receptors, such as cytokine receptors, including TNF receptors. In addition to advancing our own molecules, we will look to sign multiple collaborative partnerships to realize the potential of our platform.”

Small molecule allosteric modulators represent an unexploited kind of chemistry which is different from the traditional small molecule drugs. Orally available allosteric modulators can offer multiple competitive advantages over classical drugs. Most importantly, they can be more specific for their target receptor in the body, while at the same time, offering more precise control over receptor function. They can do this because they bind to cell surface receptors at a different site than traditional drugs. Although allosteric binding sites offer greater control, molecules that bind them cannot be identified using conventional high throughput screening techniques.

Society for Neuroscience 2010 Presentations

Sun, Nov 14, 8:00 – 9:00 AM
162.9/V17 – Novel triazinedione derivatives as GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulators: Synthesis, in vitro pharmacological characterization, pharmacokinetic profile and in vivo activity in rodent model of anxiety

Mon, Nov 15, 8:00 – 9:00 AM
406.9/MMM57 – An mGluR2/3 negative allosteric modulator improves recognition memory assessed by natural forgetting in the novel object recognition test in the rat

Mon, Nov 15, 2:00 – 3:00 PM
514.14/OOO34 – Validating the role of mGluR4 receptors in the physiopathology of anxiety using a selective mGluR4 positive allosteric modulator

Tue, Nov 16, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
557.12/M18 – Anti-parkinsonian and anti-dyskinetic effects of ADX48621, a novel mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator

Tue, Nov 16, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
642.5/E29 – JNJ-40068782: A novel potent, selective and systemically active positive allosteric modulator of the mGlu2 receptor

Tue, Nov 16, 2:00 – 3:00 PM
643.22/F23 – Identification and characterization of radioligands that bind to an allosteric modulator site on the mGlur4 receptor

Tue, Nov 16, 3:00 – 4:00 PM
651.15/I6 – Selective mGluR2 negative allosteric modulators reverse the scopolamine-induced deficit in the novel object recognition test

Wed, Nov 17, 2:00 – 3:00 PM
886.14/VV7 – Effects of a mGluR2/3 negative allosteric modulator and a reference mGluR2/3 orthosteric antagonist in a genetic mouse model of depression

Wed, Nov 17, 3:00 – 4:00 PM
885.11/TT19 – Development of a cAMP BRET cellular HTS assay to characterize pharmacological properties of mGluR7 ligands

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