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Discovery by NFCR Scientists Points Toward More Effective Chemotherapy for Aggressive Cancers

December 23, 2010

A new property of a gene known for its involvement in tumor cell development, growth, and metastasis has been discovered by National Foundation for Cancer Research scientist Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D. and his team at Virginia Commonwealth University. The researchers discovered that the AEG-1 gene protects cancer cells from destruction by chemotherapy, thus enabling aggressive cancers to withstand treatment. This property of the AEG-1 gene was previously unknown.

Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) December 22, 2010

Bethesda, MD ““ Dec. 20, 2010 ““ A new property of a gene known for its involvement in tumor cell development, growth, and metastasis has been discovered by National Foundation for Cancer Research scientist Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D. and his team at Virginia Commonwealth University. The researchers discovered that the AEG-1 gene protects cancer cells from destruction by chemotherapy, thus enabling aggressive cancers to withstand treatment. This property of the AEG-1 gene was previously unknown.

This breakthrough discovery sets the stage for research to develop means to enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy by inhibiting the AEG-1 gene from providing this protective function. This is particularly important with aggressive cancers, such as breast, liver, and prostate carcinomas, malignant gliomas and neuroblastomas that express a high level of the AEG-1 gene.

“Understanding how AEG-1 promotes resistance to chemotherapy and enhances cancer cell survival may lead to treatments that inhibit this gene and its regulated pathways, thereby uncovering potentially new therapeutic targets that can be exploited to enhance the ability of anticancer drugs to fight tumors,” said Dr. Fisher. “The potential for translating these findings into beneficial clinical approaches for patients is major, particularly for patients with aggressive cancers that are difficult to treat because of resistance to current therapies.”

“This breakthrough is the first step in taking lab results from bench to bedside, which is what NFCR strives towards every day. It is a shining example of how our scientists are constantly seeking new understandings that will help save the lives of cancer patients across the country, giving us the crucial knowledge required to improve treatments and procedures,” said Franklin C. Salisbury, Jr., President of NFCR. “We are proud to be a part of this study.”

The study was reported in the PNAS Early Edition, an online publication from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

To find out more about NFCR’s research programs, scientists and discoveries, visit http://www.nfcr.org/research.

For more information on Dr. Paul B. Fisher and his research, click here.

About the National Foundation for Cancer Research

The National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR) is a leading cancer research charity dedicated to funding cancer research and public education relating to cancer prevention, earlier diagnosis, better treatments and, ultimately, a cure for cancer. NFCR promotes and facilitates collaboration among scientists to accelerate the pace of discovery from bench to bedside.

Since 1973, NFCR has provided over $275 million in support of discovery-oriented cancer research focused on understanding how and why cells become cancerous, and on public education relating to cancer prevention, detection, and treatment. NFCR scientists are discovering cancer’s molecular mysteries and translating these discoveries into therapies that hold the hope for curing cancer. NFCR is about Research for a Cure””cures for all types of cancer. For more information, please visit http://www.NFCR.org.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2010/12/prweb4915264.htm


Source: prweb



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