Quantcast

Worldwide Vitamin D Call to Action

April 1, 2011

An international consortium of vitamin D experts published a new call to action to address the worldwide vitamin D deficiency in the latest journal of Public Health Nutrition due to their observations that the recent IOM (Institute of Medicine) report was “Ëœdeficient’.

Encinitas, CA (PRWEB) March 31, 2011

An international consortium of vitamin D experts published a new call to action to address the worldwide vitamin D deficiency in the latest journal of Public Health Nutrition due to their observations that the recent IOM (Institute of Medicine) report was “Ëœdeficient’.

Ten members of the GrassrootsHealth Call to Action Panel wrote letters indicating their points of view. “The potential benefits of vitamin D were underemphasized while overstating the evidence for potential harm” from Edward Giovannucci, Harvard; “People consistently take a supplement, first and foremost, because that supplement makes them feel better. They will continue to take vitamin D.” from John Cannell, Vitamin D Council; “The IOM’s latest recommendations are largely inconsequential. The IOM committee ignored the consensus of hundreds of vitamin D research scientists and nutritionists from at least twenty-five countries” wrote Anthony W. Norman, Emeritus Professor, University of California Riverside.

Added data from Dr. Cedric Garland, one of the authors of the latest paper published in the AntiCancer Journal said “We found that daily intakes of vitamin D by adults in the range of 4000-8000 IU are needed to maintain blood levels of vitamin D metabolites in the range needed to reduce by about half the risk of several diseases – breast cancer, colon cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes.” It is suggested that this level is in the range of 40-60 ng/ml or higher. Dr. Garland is professor of family and preventive medicine at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center. “I was surprised to find that the intakes required to maintain vitamin D status for disease prevention were so high ““ much higher than the minimal intake of vitamin D of 400 IU/day that was needed to defeat rickets in the 20th century.” Information about this study can be found on http://www.grassrootshealth.net.

One of the key findings in the AntiCancer study was that the vitamin D blood levels rose in a curvilinear fashion, with no intakes of 10,000 IU/d or lower producing vitamin D values above the lower-bound of the zone of potential toxicity (200 ng/ml). The fact that the higher intakes do not increase the blood levels in a linear fashion is a major contributor to the fact that it is hard to get to a potentially toxic level.

In addition to the GrassrootsHealth contingent, there is another consortium of ingredient suppliers, food manufacturers and public health groups which has issued a “Ëœcall to action’ to raise awareness about micronutrient deficiencies among European governments, with an accent on vitamin D.

The action plan for individuals and clinicians according to the vitamin D experts is to do vitamin D testing as necessary to establish a baseline serum level and get the serum levels to 40-60 ng/ml (100-150 nmol/L). The intakes will vary considerably and are not useful as guides to vitamin D levels.

More information on the vitamin D experts and the current GrassrootsHealth vitamin D population study can be found on http://www.grassrootshealth.net

# # #

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2011/03/prweb5213834.htm


Source: prweb



comments powered by Disqus