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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Bali Reefs Showing Biodiversity With New Species

May 13, 2011

Scientists from the Arlington Virginia-based Conservation International have discovered eight new fish and one new coral species off the coast Indonesia’s Bali island.

Senior adviser Mark Van Nydeck Erdmann yold the AFP news agency: “We have carried out a marine survey in 33 sites around Bali island. We have identified 952 reef fish, and among them we discovered eight new species.”

The surveys were carried out off the popular tourist island’s northeast coast at Tulamben, a well-known recreational dive site, as well as Nusa Dua, Gili Manuk and Pemuteran, at depths of 10 to 70 meters.

Among the new species discovered are eels and damsels, a small, colorful fish that dart among coral branches and help give reefs their dazzling appearance and play a key role in reef ecology. The new fish species had not been named yet but they were in the genuses of Siphamia, Heteroconger, Apogon, Parapercis, Meiacanthus, Manonichthys, Grallenia and Pseudochromis.

The team also found a new species of Euphyllia or bubble coral during the two-week survey.

In November last year a team of scientists discovered several new species in Indonesia’s eastern Papua region, including an eyeless cave fish and a frog that carries its offspring on its back.

Indonesia is a massive archipelago of 17,000 islands which form part of the so-called Coral Triangle, an area of rich marine biodiversity deemed vital to the health of the seas and global food stocks.

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