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Are Bats Driving You Batty? Cowleys Termite & Pest Services Advises Homeowners that August and Early Fall is the Ideal Window of Opportunity to Safely Remove and Exclude Bats From Your Home

August 20, 2011

If bats have invaded your home, August and Early Fall is the ideal time to take care of business. This is when bats leave their roost so this is the window of opportunity to “bat proof” a home and exclude them from returning during their winter absence. Bats are extremely roost-faithful, returning year after year to the same building sites. If exclusionary measures are not implemented, the bats will likely return. But before bats are excluded, they need to be evicted just like a bad tenant. A wildlife control specialist has the training and experience to remove bats safely and humanely. Eviction, followed by exclusion, is the only safe, permanent remedy to remove bats from a home or other structure.

Neptune City, NJ (PRWEB) August 20, 2011

Afraid of bats? You are hardly alone. Perhaps no creature is misunderstood and shrouded in mystery as bats. With their bulging eyes, pushed-in snouts, vampire-like incisors, vein-covered translucent wings, and alien-like ears, bats have always been burdened with centuries of misinformation. Many believe that bats thrive on human blood. In fact, there are only three species of bats that live off the blood of cattle and they all reside in Latin America. Compound all this with the myth of Dracula and it’s hardly surprising that, along with ghosts, goblins, and spiders, bats have become a staple of spooky Halloween décor.

So, what’s the reality of these nocturnal creatures? Bats are neither birds nor rodents. They are mammals that produce only one or two offspring per year. There are nearly 1,000 species of bats and New Jersey is home to nine of them. Six are year-around residents and three are migratory. If you run into a bat in New Jersey, it is likely to be the insectivorous Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus). Bats do far more good then harm. At night, they become nature’s vacuum cleaner, sucking up the insect population, especially annoying adult mosquitoes. They are vital to our ecosystem and conservation groups are active in their protection.

According to Drew Cowley, a wildlife removal specialist, “I often receive frantic phone calls from homeowners who have found a bat suddenly appearing in their kitchen or living room. I hear a litany of common questions: “ËœIs it rabid?’ “Will it attack me?’ “What should I do?’ Often, I hear something with a bit more urgency like “Get someone over here now. I want this disgusting thing out of my house!”

Continued Cowley, “Perhaps, the most important place to start is what you can’t do. Bats are a protected species. It is illegal for anyone, including animal control officers and professional wildlife removal specialists to kill bats. Terminal traps and poisonous bait traps should never be used.”

A wildlife control specialist has the training and experience to remove bats safely and humanely. More important, after eviction, a home needs to be made “bat proof” to prevent later reentry. Eviction, followed by exclusion, is the only safe, permanent remedy.

Close inspection of entry points usually reveals brown stains caused by body oils where the bats squeeze in and out and possibly a few mouse-like droppings adhering to the building just below. Bats must eat and drink daily. When they emerge at dusk to feed, homeowners should watch their home to see where the bats leave. This information will greatly assist the bat removal specialist who, upon closer inspection, will locate the holes or cracks allowing the bats access the structure.

Common access routes are:

  • under the eaves
  • behind a chimney or loose board
  • beneath a roof’s ridge cap
  • inside an opening made by squirrels or birds
  • loose-fitting screen doors

Once exits have been located, the bats can be excluded. However, this should not be done when flightless young may be present which is usually in June and July. Excluding the parents will starve the young, creating an odor problem from the decaying carcasses. Bats leave their roosts starting in August and into the fall. This is the ideal time to set up physical barriers, mostly netting, permitting exclusion during their winter absence. Bats are extremely roost-faithful, returning year after year to the same building sites. If exclusionary measures are not implemented, the bats will likely return.

Said Cowley, “Never forget that bats are wild animals. The same health concerns and precautions that we take with other wild animals like raccoons, opossums and skunks, apply equally to bats. Bats that can be caught, especially those found on the ground or are unable to fly should be assumed to be sick and treated with caution. Children, in particular, should be warned to never pick up bats. If you have to remove a sick bat from the house, use thick leather work gloves and make sure the bat is disposed of in a place where it will not be found by pets or other animals.”

Bats are carriers of rabies. If you suspect you may have been bitten, or a bat was in the room with you while you were sleeping, contact your health professional immediately. Bat bites and scratches are often not noticeable. Bat teeth are tiny and razor sharp, leaving a mark the size of a pinprick.

Cowleys Termite & Pest Services, founded in October 1991, helps homeowners deal with a full range of pest infestations. Through its Little Rascals Nuisance Wildlife Removal Division, Cowley’s offers bat, bird, rodent, and other wildlife removal. For more information visit http://www.cowleys.com or call 866-9-COWLEY.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2011/8/prweb8730854.htm


Source: prweb



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