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WMU 5A Sells Out of Antlerless Deer Licenses; PA Game Commission 2007 Calendar on Sale

November 3, 2006

HARRISBURG, Pa., Nov. 3 /PRNewswire/ — Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe today announced that WMU 5A in Southcentral Pennsylvania has exhausted its antlerless deer license allocation. WMU 5A is comprised of portions of Adams, Cumberland, Franklin and York counties.

So far, 19 of the state’s 22 Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) have exhausted their antlerless deer license allocations. Those WMUs are: 1A, 1B, 2A, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D, 5A, 5B and 5C.

Of the 859,000 antlerless licenses originally allocated, only 22,564 antlerless deer licenses remain. Following is a listing of the available antlerless deer licenses for those WMUs with remaining allocations as of today (along with the initial allocation for each WMU): WMU 2B, 19,477 (68,000); WMU 4E, 484 (38,000); and WMU 5D, 2,603 (20,000).

For updated information, please visit the Game Commission’s “Doe License Update” in the “Quick Clicks” box in the upper right-hand corner of the agency’s homepage (http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/).

Regular antlerless licenses and first-round unsold licenses were to be mailed by county treasurers to successful applicants no later than Monday, Sept. 18. Second-round unsold licenses were to be mailed no later than Sunday, Oct. 1.

County treasurers in WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D began accepting, on Monday, Sept. 18, applications for antlerless licenses over the counter in those three urbanized WMUs.

Beginning Monday, Nov. 6, hunters may apply over-the-counter for unsold antlerless licenses in all WMUs.

Resident and nonresident hunters may apply for Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) coupons that remain available for antlerless deer hunting opportunities, especially in those WMUs that have sold out of their antlerless deer license allocations.

“While DMAP permits may be used only on the specific property for which they are issued, they do offer hunters additional antlerless deer hunting opportunities,” Roe said. “DMAP was developed to provide a way for hunters to help landowners achieve the type of deer harvest they require to better manage their lands. We encourage hunters to contact these landowners and to help them manage deer populations on their properties.”

Landowners can’t charge or accept any contribution from a hunter for a DMAP coupon. While hunters may obtain up to two DMAP permits per property, DMAP permits do not impact a hunter’s eligibility to apply for and receive antlerless deer licenses issued for WMUs.

DMAP permit allotments are not part of the annual general antlerless deer license allocations for WMUs. Hunters may not use DMAP permits to harvest an antlered deer.

Resident hunters must mail DMAP coupons in a regular envelope, along with a check for $6 made payable to the Pennsylvania Game Commission, to the address listed on the coupon to receive their DMAP antlerless deer permit. Nonresidents must include a check for $26. The permit can be used to harvest one antlerless deer on the specific DMAP property. Maps for the properties are to be provided to hunters by the landowners.

For more information on DMAP, visit the Game Commission’s website (http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/) and click on the “DMAP” box in the center of the homepage. Hunters also can check the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ website to see where coupons still are available for various state forests and parks by clicking on: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/dmap/available.aspx.

Created in 1895 as an independent state agency, the Game Commission is responsible for conserving and managing all wild birds and mammals in the Commonwealth, establishing hunting seasons and bag limits, enforcing hunting and trapping laws, and managing habitat on the 1.4 million acres of State Game Lands it has purchased over the years with hunting and furtaking license dollars to safeguard wildlife habitat. The agency also conducts numerous wildlife conservation programs for schools, civic organizations and sportsmen’s clubs.

The Game Commission does not receive any general state taxpayer dollars for its annual operating budget. The agency is funded by license sales revenues; the state’s share of the federal Pittman-Robertson program, which is an excise tax collected through the sale of sporting arms and ammunition; and monies from the sale of oil, gas, coal, timber and minerals derived from State Game Lands.

GAME COMMISSION 2007 CALENDAR ON SALE

As Pennsylvanians plan for the holiday gift-giving season, the Pennsylvania Game Commission unveiled its 2007 calendar, priced at $8.95 (plus tax and shipping), on “The Outdoor Shop” on the agency’s website (http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/) and at all Game Commission offices.

The 2007 calendar provides a listing of approved season dates from Jan. 1-June 30, and tentative season dates for July 1-Dec. 31, as well as a reminder about National Hunting & Fishing Day in September.

The 2007 calendar features a year’s worth of dramatic wildlife photos taken by agency employees: Hal Korber, wildlife education specialist at the Harrisburg headquarters; Willard Hill, Game Lands maintenance supervisor in the Southcentral Region; Billie Cromwell, retired Food and Cover Crew foreman in Fulton County; Timothy C. Flanigan, retired Bedford County Wildlife Conservation Officer; Jacob Dingel, radio dispatcher in the Northwest Region Office; Joe Kosack, public information writer at the Harrisburg headquarters; and Willard Hill, Game Lands Maintenance Supervisor in the Southcentral Region.

January through December features a full-color photo of a different wildlife species, including: a pair of bull elk sparring; a male cardinal; a male wood duck; a long-tailed weasel; an adult doe with a fawn; a pair of great egrets; a brood of wild turkey poults; a pair of river otters; an eastern coyote; a buck and doe; and a ruffed grouse. Also, a tranquil scene from State Game Lands in Butler County is included as a reminder of how sportsmen’s dollars have been used to preserve more than 1.4 million acres throughout the state to serve as wildlife habitat and public hunting and trapping grounds.

The calendar also provides a brief overview of the Game Commission and a list of contact information for the agency’s Harrisburg headquarters and six region offices.

Created in 1895 as an independent state agency, the Game Commission is responsible for conserving and managing all wild birds and mammals in the Commonwealth, establishing hunting seasons and bag limits, enforcing hunting and trapping laws, and managing habitat on the 1.4 million acres of State Game Lands it has purchased over the years with hunting and furtaking license dollars to safeguard wildlife habitat. The agency also conducts numerous wildlife conservation programs for schools, civic organizations and sportsmen’s clubs.

The Game Commission does not receive any general state taxpayer dollars for its annual operating budget. The agency is funded by license sales revenues; the state’s share of the federal Pittman-Robertson program, which is an excise tax collected through the sale of sporting arms and ammunition; and monies from the sale of oil, gas, coal, timber and minerals derived from State Game Lands.

Pennsylvania Game Commission

CONTACT: Jerry Feaser, Pennsylvania Game Commission, +1-717-705-6541,PGCNews@state.pa.us

Web Site: http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/forestry/dmap/available.aspxhttp://www.pgc.state.pa.us/




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