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BASS BETS; Angler’s Sales Pitch a Long Story

June 15, 2007

By TED ANCHER

ANGLER: Jay Guidaboni, 39, Plymouth.

OCCUPATION: Sales representative for Sherwin-Williams Paint Company. Sponsored by Ranger Boats, Mercury Outboards, Venom Baits, Bass Boat Saver, Vicious Tournament Team, Global Marine Insurance, Bob’s Bait & Tackle and Falmouth Bait & Tackle.

BASS PAST: ABA New England East Division 5 Angler of Year 2006; ABA Eagle Angler of Year 2006; ABA Associate Angler of Year 2003,’05; Plymouth Rock Bassmasters Angler of Year four times; holds club’s record for one-day five bass limit, 24.55-pounds. Guidaboni has 24 career wins.

FAVORITE LOCAL LAKE: Long Pond, 716 acres, Brewster/Harwich.

BEST DAY ON LONG POND: A 15-plus pound limit of smallies. His biggest largemouth was 3 1/2 pounds, biggest smallmouth 4 1/2 pounds. Average outing produces 7-14 bass except in spring when catching 20-40 is not unusual.

HOTSPOTS & BAITS:

** 1 – Weedy area about 10 feet deep, best in spring for largemouth with 5-inch Venom Salty Sling (Senko style bait) rigged wacky style. Cast to overhangs, docks or fancast entire area.

** 2 – Submerged point out to 25 feet deep. Fish edges all year with 5-inch straight tail watermelon or green/pumpkin colored worm rigged Shakey Head style. In spring and fall use a blueshad 3/- ounce Nichols spinnerbait with tandem silver willow blades. This imitates the large herring population here. If tough, try a gold bladed Mepps No. 3 in-line spinner.

** 3-5 – Skip a 4-inch Venom Salty Tube, or Salty Sling under docks along entire stretch, anytime.

** 6 – Expansive flat 10-feet deep. Good spring or fall. Summer, fish only in a.m. or at dropoff. Use spinnerbait, in-line spinner or black/gold Lucky Craft suspending jerkbait over this area in spring and fall. Fish dropoff with Shakey Head worm rig or drop-shot a 5- inch straight tail worm. Use 8-pound Vicious fluorocarbon line to combat clear water conditions.

** 7, 8 – Rocky bottom main lake points, good all year with drop- shot 5-inch worm or drag a 4-inch tube along bottom out 25-30 feet deep.

** 9, 10 – Skip same baits under docks.

** 11 – Mouth of inlet where herring run occurs. Use the Nichols spinnerbait here.

** 12 – Cove with steep dropoff, good in summer, fall with drop- shot worm or Carolina rig a 5-inch green/pumpkin or watermelon/ redflake Zoom lizard on 40-inch leader.

** 13-15 – Expansive flat, 10-feet deep. Best in spring and fall with spinnerbaits and jerkbaits. Summer, fish dropoff with drop- shot worm.

** 16 – Steep dropping main lake point. Use drop-shot and watermelon/redflake 4-inch tube with 1/- 1/4 ounce tube heads.

** 17 – Fish very end of extended submerged gravel point about 10- feet deep surrounded by 20-plus foot depths. Good anytime with Carolina rigged lizard, drop-shot. Jerkbait from shallows out to deep end in spring.

** 18 – Weedy area with pads in front of bog. Fancast a Salty Sling weightless rigged wacky style over entire area in late spring or fall.

** 19 – Gravel bottom flat. Good in spring with jerkbait and in- line spinners.

** 20 – Steep shore in cove, fish in summer and fall with Carolina rigged lizard.

** 21 – Rock and gravel flats extending 75 yards from shore. Best in spawn, but produces all year. Use spinnerbait, in-line spinner and jerkbaits. Spinnerbait if windy.

TIP: In spite of having a large bass population, this lake can be very tough. Especially in midsummer. Fish can be found 20-30 feet deep and in 2-foot of water on same day. So try all depths and methods until you hook up.

ACCESS: Ramp at beach on Long Pond Road. Four-wheel drive recommended. Only open before Memorial Day and after Labor Day unless you have a resident sticker.

To purchase “BassBets 1″ or “BassBets 3″ send $21 to Bass Bets, PO Box 1071, Upton, MA 01568 or go to bassbets.com.

CAPTION: (Numerically-labeled map of Long Pond. For complete graphic, see Boston Herald microfilm or .pdf.) STAFF GRAPHIC BY SARAH DUBOIS

(c) 2007 Boston Herald. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights Reserved.




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