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Science News Archive - April 12, 2006

By Peter Apps and Ranga Sirilal COLOMBO (Reuters) - For Buddhist monks and astrologers, when Sri Lanka permanently puts its clocks back thirty minutes at midnight on Friday, the island is putting itself back in sync with the stars and planets.

The man leading efforts to eradicate giant Burmese python snakes from Everglades National Park sounds almost fearful, and certainly not optimistic, when he talks about the chances of wiping out an invasive species he calls "the enemy."

Three towns in northern Serbia called for emegency measures to deal with floods on Wednesday, while levels in the Sava and Danube rivers in the capital Belgrade were close to record highs and still rising.

By Ken Raymond, The Daily Oklahoman Apr. 12--Jesse Griffin's gleaming smile has little to do with pearly whites. His glistening grins come courtesy of a 14-karat gold "grill.""I wear it every day," said Griffin, 18, a junior at Norman North High School. "Except for when I eat.

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - An international team of scientists have discovered 4.1 million year old fossils in eastern Ethiopia that fill a missing gap in human evolution. The teeth and bones belong to a primitive species of Australopithecus known as Au.

Yale researchers have found that chloride ions are critical to hearing in mammals and that some environmental toxins may disrupt the balance of these ions in ear cells and therefore disrupt hearing.

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Fossils have long provided snapshots of the human family tree, but a new find in Africa gives scientists a kind of mini home movie showing man's primal development.

Swedish geologists have found fossilized feces from a worm that lived some 500 million years ago, media reports said Wednesday.

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Singapore's siren song is growing increasingly more irresistible for scientists, especially stem cell researchers who feel stifled by the U.S. government's restrictions on their field.

Using hand-me-down technology from the Cold War, scientists have discovered that the seafloor off the Pacific Northwest is a jumping kind of place, with thousands of small, swarming earthquakes and tectonic plates that are slowly rearranging themselves.

Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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