Quantcast
Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 17:35 EDT

Science News Archive - March 31, 2008

b767aa016ec2014117f717d194aeacbb1

As traffic continues to build in parts of western Mongolia, conservationists grow increasingly weary of the potential consequences it may have for the saiga, a rare species of antelope.

f15bc454f8c01b9afa77f13ee34102bc1

Researchers at the Memphis Zoo hope to be able battle the dwindling population of endangered Mississippi Gopher Frogs by using in-vitro fertilization.

By RACHELLE ADAM A little-known process is underway, the outcome of which could have an irrevocable impact on Israeli society in general and Jerusalem in particular.

Each Monday, this column turns a page in history to explore the discoveries, events and people that continue to affect the history being made today.

If Martian life existed a few billion years ago, scientists think any plant-like microbes would have left behind a stringy fuzz of fibers. That's because here on Earth, researchers now say they have found such ancient fuzz, called cellulose, preserved in chunks of salt deposited more than 250 million years ago -- making it the oldest biological substance yet recovered. The announcement comes about a week after a team of planetary scientists announced discovering evaporated salt deposits on Mars and adds another element of hope to the search for alien life or signs of its past biology. In fact, microscopic cellulose fibers might be one of the best signatures of any past life on the red planet, said Jack Griffith, a microbiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "These fibers are the oldest native, intact remnants of a living thing ever directly observed," Griffith told SPACE.com.

e255fc7e58ddfdad83af9aae7937a05f1

A protein called Pum regulates the expression of genes that alter synaptic plasticity

8c9083b02626fb83c1545c7532aa0f361

After half a century of debate, a University of Alberta researcher has confirmed that dome-headed dinosaurs called pachycephalosaurs could collide with each other during courtship combat. Eric Snively, an Alberta Ingenuity fellow at the U of A, used computer software to smash the sheep-sized dinosaurs together in a virtual collision and results showed that their bony domes could emerge unscathed.

9528987171f539803c4676d3f1cf45d11

Frustrated by tape that won't peel off the roll in a straight line? Angry at wallpaper that refuses to tear neatly off the wall? A new study reveals why these efforts can be so aggravating. Wallpaper is not out to foil you-it's just obeying the laws of physics, according to a team of researchers from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Paris, the Universidad de Santiago, Chile, and MIT.

198c12549494f31b9993088556ea7bb31

Unlike carbon dioxide and methane, laughing gas has been largely ignored by world leaders as a worrying greenhouse gas. But nitrous oxide must be taken more seriously, says Professor David Richardson from the University of East Anglia in Norwich, UK