Quantcast

Science News Archive - February 04, 2009

The World Wildlife Fund and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature received a $2 million grant for climate change strategies. The grant is to be used to develop a new Ecosystems and Livelihoods Adaptation Network to serve as a resource for conservation groups, governments, international agencies and others working to make vulnerable ecosystems more resilient, and help human communities adapt sensibly to changing climate, the MacArthur Foundation said Tuesday in a news release. The union said the network will initially focus on the developing world, where climate impacts are generally more acute and response capacity is more limited. The scale and urgency of climate change demands global cooperation and innovation to help animal and human populations adapt to our changing planet, Jonathan Fanton, president of the MacArthur Foundation, said in a statement.

Chinese researchers say they've successfully cloned five human embryos for use in medical research. Four of the embryos were developed using skin tissue from healthy donors and the fifth was from cells of patients with Parkinson's disease, Xinhua news service reported Tuesday. The Shandong Stem Cell

44af92d30a78bf06b9604c7c61c3f8501

Although Congress is fighting through a massive economic stimulus bill on Capitol Hill, the Senate's top environmental lawmaker said climate change legislation is not far off and could happen within weeks, not months.

9874ed5eb7e9a94cdc1bd33023cd0a7b1

Climate change seems to have no effect on Argentina's huge Perito Moreno glacier, which is flourishing despite the global warming that is melting others around it.

More U.S. companies are announcing peanut-related product recalls in the midst of a nationwide Salmonella outbreak. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said the contamination occurred at a Peanut Corp.

a81a1a208a27558f5889761c97a7e39e1

An unexpected lack of wind in the US can cause blackouts.

3a9f9424e465eba0f0870ba485ac966d1

The facial structure of an ancient relative of modern humans may have evolved to allow them to eat large, hard nuts and seeds as part of a survival strategy.

Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
Related