Quantcast

Science News Archive - July 01, 2009

Researchers say baldcypress trees in central Texas provide a record of past weather and clues to the region's future. Malcolm Cleaveland of the University of Arkansas and his team have been taking cores from the trees that show the rings, the Austin American-Statesman reported Tuesday.

392673726deb4ac3354e255eeeb50145

Researchers have said in a new report that coastal development and declining water quality are threatening seagrasses worldwide.

978d5d59a2c3fdca7f15b7cc667798d8

The European Food Safety Authority declared on Tuesday that a genetically modified strain of maize banned in some EU countries poses no risk to health or the environment.

86d82630687d9866ad71a53dadeee6c3

Strangely shaped fruits and vegetables, such as bendy cucumbers and knobbly carrots, will be allowed back into European supermarkets on July 1.

b73439bbc48d8225de294ad5490931bc

California celebrated on Tuesday when the Obama administration approved their longtime bid to sanction their own stringent requirements for vehicle emissions.

103238a807c37b7ee08483d4f25c6797

Transcriptomic tests have uncovered the protein composition of venom from the Scorpiops jendeki scorpion.

4f82d39dfad705c732fca4f5ee7d18ba

Extinction looms for amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds restricted to declining mangrove forests.

An observer feels more empathy for someone in pain when that person is in the same social group, according to new research in the July 1 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

ade9ce42f2fbc73649e2a39892c40e2a

According to new research published online in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B on July 1, 2009, a new fossil primate from Myanmar suggests that the common ancestor of humans, monkeys and apes evolved from primates in Asia, not Africa as many researchers believe.

94dc39470c452094d981275caa3b1612

Alaska’s Mount Redoubt has gradually slowed down in activity since the last eruption three months ago.

Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.