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Science News Archive - July 04, 2009

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A new study has shed light on the extent and causes behind the oceans’ quickly vanishing seagrass meadows, a vital resource for thousands of species of marine life.

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The newest revolution in microbiology testing walks on four legs and says "baa."

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In a fervent attempt to resolve differences on issues of the world’s carbon emissions, officials from a 17-member, majority comprised body are coming together on the eve of a July 8-10 summit of the G8 to hold critical discussions.

The head of a Japanese expedition in the Antarctic says so-called Green Room growth techniques have proved invaluable to the researchers. Expedition leader Shuki Ushio said the Japanese agricultural breakthrough that uses fluorescent lights to grow vegetables indoors has allowed expedition members to eat more than simple freeze-dried food products, Kyodo News reported Saturday. I didn't think we could eat fresh crispy vegetables, Ushio said.

The disease blamed for the Irish potato famine in the 1840s is infecting tomato and potato plants in the eastern United States, agricultural officials said. A press release from Cornell University, New York state's land grant college, warned home gardeners and commercial farmers that late blight is killing the tomato and potato plants.

Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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