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Science News Archive - August 25, 2009

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Damage to the honey bee’s internal protein-producing “factories” may provide researchers with a new clue to the sudden collapse of honey bee colonies across the nation.

Canadian scientists say they might have discovered a clue to the cause of type 1 diabetes -- a possible link to an abnormal response to wheat protein. Scientists at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the University of Ottawa, led by Professor Fraser Scott, tested 42 people with type 1 diabetes and found nearly half had that abnormal wheat protein immune response. Scott's team said it is the first to clearly show immune cells called T cells from people with type 1 diabetes are more likely to overreact to wheat.

Canadian scientists say they have discovered rosiglitazone (Avandia) a type 2 diabetes drug, might be linked with increased risk of heart failure and death. The scientists from the University of Toronto and the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center in Toronto, said the linkage was found among older patients, compared to a similar drug, pioglitazone (Actos). The scientists used prescription records to identify nearly 40,000 patients aged 66 years and older who started treatment with either rosiglitazone or pioglitazone between April 2002 and March 2008.

British scientists say studying brown adipose tissue found in hibernating animals and newborn babies may lead to new ways of preventing obesity. The researchers from the University of Nottingham, led by Professor Michael Symonds, said studies have already shown brown adipose tissue -- brown fat -- in adults is reduced with obesity.

A specific gene is particularly frequently involved in the development of short stature. Researchers in Heidelberg have now discovered that sequences of genetic material on the X and Y chromosome that regulate this gene are also crucial for growth in children.

Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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