Quantcast

Science News Archive - January 07, 2010

c63ff14754b453c6ce001df5d567676a1

Fossilized footprints of a mysterious, long-extinct creature in a Polish quarry have caused paleontologists to reconsider traditional thinking of how sea-based vertebrates moved to land.

459c263dfd7f7320e9b7dbc0596c61ad1

Regions across east and central China, such as Hubei and Jiangxi provinces, have resorted to rationing of power for industry to tide them over through the icy weather that has pushed up energy demand while disrupting coal transportation.

1abd3650fbb5fc4dd55100e65710deef1

Three Iowa State University physicists who took winter trips to the Large Hadron Collider for meetings and experimental work are starting to see real data from the planet's biggest science experiment.

a5d996442739a4e17a16f79c449dfa951

Camera traps deep in the Sumatran jungle have captured first-time images of a rare female tiger and her cubs, giving researchers unique insight into the elusive tiger's behavior.

49c1908584d974f2203769ecf54b8f8f1

The teeth of a 30,000-year-old child are shedding new light on the evolution of modern humans, thanks to research from the University of Bristol published this week in PNAS.

5614aca223be128b5e1d155cc34fea131

With the recent emergence of record-breaking cold snaps all over the world, climate experts say that it doesn’t disprove global warming, but is only a blip in the long-term heating trend.

Amid concerns regarding terrorists targeting airliners using weapons less detectable by traditional means, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is ramping up deployment of whole body scanners at security checkpoints in U.S. airports.

New tools show potential for treating brain disorders.

The space within reach of our hands — where actions such as grasping and touching occur — is known as the “action space.”

New tools use light to turn off brain cells and possibly treat brain disorders.

Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.