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Science News Archive - September 21, 2010

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Experts in Britain and the United States are working to create an accurate record of the world's known plant species, and have so far reduced the global inventory by some 600,000 species.

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A conservationist and a team from the BBC Natural History Unit discovered a “lost” tiger population at a higher altitude than any others known, increases the chances of linking isolated groups of large cats across Asia.

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Snowmelt in the Colorado River basin is occurring earlier, reducing runoff and the amount of crucial water available downstream.

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The world’s tiniest nuclear genome appears to have “snipped off the ends” of its chromosomes and evolved into a lean, mean, genome machine that infects human cells.

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A group of experts is urging the FDA to hold off on approving genetically modified salmon fit for consumption.

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Below the surface, thousands of marine creatures are still in danger from Gulf oil disaster.

Researchers have discovered that women, female monkeys and female mice have major similarities when it comes to how bisphenol A (BPA) is metabolized, and they have renewed their call for governmental regulation when it comes to the estrogen-like chemical found in many everyday products.

A 2008 study found that organic apples represented 4.6% of total apple sales in the United States, up from 3.5% in 2007.

Four East Tennessee homes completed this month showcase how scientific research can make dramatic changes in the cost of heating and cooling our homes.

More than 35 years after Oregon began one of the nation’s most ambitious land use planning programs, a new study suggests it’s still difficult to demonstrate that it has accomplished one of its primary goals – protecting agricultural lands and a thriving forest, farm and ranching industry.

Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin