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Probing the inner regions of a young star and its planet

Probing the inner regions of a young star and its planet

Astronomers have probed deeper than before into a planetary system 130 light-years from Earth. The observations mark the first results of a new exoplanet survey called LEECH (LBT Exozodi Exoplanet...

Latest Space Stories

Search of 100000 galaxies found no alien life

You mean to tell us there are no Wookies, Klingons, or Sontarans out there?

Curiosity runs 10k on Mars

Curiosity is doing all of us down here on Earth proud as he completed a total drive of 10 km on his way to analyze the Washboard unit.

The real Death Star This white dwarf may have destroyed a

In Star Wars, the Death Star is a massive spaceship capable of destroying a planet with just one shot of its laser, but a recently-discovered white dwarf star may have ripped apart a planet at its core by coming too close to it, making it a real-life Death Star.

Blasting away space junk with freakin lasers

As space debris becomes an increasing issue, scientists think they have found away to laser it out of harm's way for the astronauts.

How glitter could help find extrasolar planets

Typically, glitter is something that you expect to find in a grade-school classroom, but the small, flat reflective particles are serving as the inspiration for a new type of reflective mirror that could help NASA develop a low-cost new type of space telescope mirrors.

Dark matter may actually interact with itself

By observing colliding galaxies with the ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have found evidence suggesting for the first time that dark matter may interact with other dark matter in a way other than through gravity.

Spitzer telescope finds one of the most distant planets ever

Thanks to NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and a technique known as microlensing, a team of astronomers has located one of the most distant exoplanets ever discovered – a remote gas planet located approximately 13,000 light-years from Earth.

Rosetta changes trajectory continues search for Philae

The ESA’s Rosetta orbiter is continuing its search for the Philae lander, despite experiencing issues during a recent flyby causing it to be put in safe mode and completely change its trajectory.

SpaceX rocket landing attempt fails again

Close but no cigar for SpaceX on its latest attempt to land a rocket booster on a barge at sea for recovery and reuse, as the made it to its destination but landed “too hard” to survive.

Synthetic muscle headed to the ISS for testing

When SpaceX launches the sixth resupply mission to the International Space Station this week, it will be carrying experimental "robotic muscles" that a Massachusetts company hopes can be used to make the next generation of robots.

Titans violent methane storms may solve dune direction

The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has studied Titan for many years. But its tantalising discoveries about Saturn’s largest moon have led to new mysteries. One of those involves what seem to be wind-created sand dunes spotted by Cassini near the moon’s equator. These dunes are up to one hundred yards high, many miles in length, and point to the east. Climate simulations indicate that Titan’s near-surface winds, similar to Earth’s trade winds, blow toward the west. What’s going on?

Microwave ovens not aliens may be source of strange radio

The mystery surrounding an unusual type of radio signals known as perytons that have been detected at the Parkes Observatory in Australia has been solved, and a microwave oven, not an interstellar phenomenon or an extraterrestrial life form, is apparently the source.

Meet the Vulcan ULAs new rocket system

Colorado-based United Launch Alliance (ULA) has unveiled a new rocket system that it claims will be more affordable and accessible than currently available space-travel options and could be used for missions travelling all the way to the dwarf planet Pluto.

NASA releases first-ever color map of Ceres

NASA has released the first color map of Ceres, and while the data is still said to have come from early observational stages, it nonetheless indicates that the dwarf planet was shaped by a series of diverse processes since its formation some 4.5 billion years ago.

Astronomers discover most hostile exoplanet

Yikes. Astronomers recently discovered that a distant exoplanet has one of the most hostile atmospheres known to man, with wind speeds of more than 620 miles per hour and temperatures of greater than 5400 degrees F.

ISS to study bone density in space

As part of the agency’s ongoing research into how the human body responds to an extended period of time in microgravity environments, NASA officials announced on Friday that it plans to send osteocyte cultures to the International Space Station for the first time.

The universe Not expanding as fast as you think

Astronomers found that the type of supernovae commonly used to measure distances in the universe fall into distinct populations not recognized before, and this questions how fast the universe has been expanding.

SpaceX to attempt daring rocket landingagain

After a failed attempt to land the rocket on a barge, SpaceX will make another attempt at landing the Falcon 9 and its Dragon capsule. We are holding our breaths!

Astronaut photographs MLB stadiums as seen from space

As part of a social media game, NASA astronaut Terry Virts is taking pictures of every MLB stadium from his perch in the ISS, and he's asking us to guess which stadium is which. It's harder than it sounds.


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Word of the Day
eupeptic
  • Of or relating to good digestion.
  • Cheerful.
The word 'eupeptic' comes from Greek roots meaning 'good' and 'digest'.
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Science is intimately integrated with the whole social structure and cultural tradition. They mutually support one other only in certain types of society can science flourish, and conversely without a continuous and healthy development and application of science such a society cannot function properly.

- Talcott Parsons (1902 - 1979)
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