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Mars once had more water than Arctic Ocean

Mars once had more water than Arctic Ocean

A primitive ocean on Mars held more water than Earth’s Arctic Ocean, according to NASA scientists who, using ground-based observatories, measured water signatures in the Red Planet’s atmosphere.

Latest Space Stories

Stars may need galactic rain to form

Some of the galaxies in our universe are veritable star nurseries. For example, our own Milky Way produces, on average, at least one new star every year. Others went barren years ago, now producing few if any new stars. But why?

Curiosity rover taking a breather for a few days

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is expected to remain stationary for several days of engineering analysis following an onboard fault-protection action on Feb. 27 that halted a process of transferring sample material between devices on the rover's robotic arm.

ISS experiment Why does space change vision

A new experiment, scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the spring, plans to take a long look at vision changes often experienced by astronauts during extended spaceflights, NASA officials announced on Tuesday.

3D print your own virtual spaceship

If you’re one of the lucky few who have managed to master the Kerbal Space Program design simulator, a 3D printing company is now making it possible for you to create a lasting monument to your success with a plastic replica of the vessel that you created.

PHOTOS NASA predecessor NACA marks 100 years of innovation

Today marks a special anniversary for the NASA family. It was 100 years ago, on March 3, 1915, when Congress created the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the organization from which NASA was created in 1958.

Dust in early universe proves galaxies were quickly enriched

Dust plays an extremely important role in the universe - both in the formation of planets and new stars. But dust was not there from the beginning and the earliest galaxies had no dust, only gas. Now an international team of astronomers, led by researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute, has discovered a dust-filled galaxy from the very early universe. The discovery demonstrates that galaxies were very quickly enriched with dust particles containing elements such as carbon and oxygen, which could form planets. The results are published in the scientific journal, Nature.

Iron gives clues to formation of Earth and moon

Recreating the violent conditions of Earth's formation, scientists are learning more about how iron vaporizes and how this iron rain affected the formation of the Earth and Moon. The study is published March 2 in Nature Geoscience.

Cluster of stars found forming at edge of Milky Way

A team of Brazilian astronomers were surprised when they investigated a seemingly empty spot in the Milky Way and found a stellar nursery containing 2 clusters of stars.

Watching alloys change from liquid to solid on ISS

If you put a camera in the ice machine and watched water turn into ice, the process would look simple. But the mechanism behind liquids turning to solids is actually quite complex, and understanding it better could improve design and production of metals. A recent investigation aboard the International Space Station contributed to that understanding.

Russia commits to ISS until 2024 plans to build own station

Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, has pledged support for the International Space Station (ISS) through 2024, but will look to build its own orbiting base after that time.

Galactic dinosaurs found hiding in plain sight

Astronomers have long wondered exactly what fate befell the compact massive galaxies that could be found throughout the universe during its infancy, but new research from experts at the Swinburne University of Technology may have finally discovered the answer.

South Pole Telescope to join black hole-studying array

The South Pole Telescope is now ready for use in the search for black holes and will be joining its buddy, The Event Horizon Telescope.

Model shows different kind of life on Titan

A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled by a team of Cornell University researchers.

ESA soliciting CubeSats for deep-space asteroid mission

The first CubeSats (or tiny probes) designed to travel to deep space are going to launch in 2020, and the ESA is seeking innovative ideas for the probes.

Curiosity confirms methane in Mars atmosphere possibility of

The tunable laser spectrometer in the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument of the Curiosity robot has unequivocally detected an episodic increase in the concentration of methane in Mars' atmosphere after an exhaustive analysis of data obtained during 605 soles or Martian days.

Largest black hole ever discovered mass of 12 billion suns

The largest and most luminous black hole ever seen has been discovered, with a mass about 12 billion times that of the sun.

MUSE captures best-ever 3D image of deep universe

The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope has one-upped the Hubble Space Telescope, producing the best-ever three-dimensional view of the deep universe while revealing previously invisible objects, ESO officials announced this morning.

Uh what are those bright lights on Ceres

A bright spot previously detected on the dwarf planet Ceres appears to have a somewhat dimmer companion, and NASA remain unable to explain exactly what these unusual lights are.

ESA satellites to assist with alpine rescues

The European Space Agency (ESA) is joining forces with TeleConsult Austria to develop an Internet-based system that combines satellites and other forms of technology to assist in Alpine rescue efforts.

Unusual sungrazer comet passes near sun survives

An unusual comet was spotted by the NASA/ESA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) as it travelled near the sun late last week, and unlike most other comets that make such a voyage, this one actually lived to tell the tale.


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Word of the Day
mitraille
  • Small missiles, especially grape, canister, fragments of iron, and the like, when fired, as upon an enemy at close quarters.
  • To fire mitraille at.
The word 'mitraille' comes from the Old French 'mitaille', meaning 'small coins', sometimes used to mean 'scrap iron'.
Quote of the Day
We have genuflected before the god of science only to find that it has given us the atomic bomb, producing fears and anxieties that science can never mitigate.

- Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968)
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