Quantcast

NASA Says Life On Venus Claim Is False

January 25, 2012

Just days after a Russian scientist claimed to have found life on Venus, NASA has debunked the new myth.

Leonid Ksanfomaliti of the Space Research Institute at Russia´s Academy of Sciences examined photographs taken by the probe Venera 13 in 1982, and determined the images showed a scorpion-shaped body that moved as the probe´s cameras recorded the scene.

However, NASA says that the moving body was actually a lens cap, not a scorpion.

“It makes much more sense that it’s a piece of the lander designed to break off during the deployment of one of the scientific instrument,” Jonathon Hill, a NASA mission planner, told The Daily Mail.

No evidence of life on Venus has ever been found on its 880 degrees Fahrenheit surface, but Ksanfomaliti wrote in the Russian Solar Systems Research magazine that new evidence had emerged.

“What if we forget about the current theories about the non-existence of life on Venus?  Let´s boldly suggest that the objects´ morphological features would allow us to say that they are living,” he said in the report.

Ksanfomaliti used a Russian probe from 1982, while Hill used high-resolution images, as well as other photos by an identical landing probe, Venera 14.  In Hill’s research, he found the same object shows up in a photograph taken by the identical probe.

“If those objects were already on the surface of Venus, what are the chances that Venera 13 and 14, which landed nearly 1,000 kilometers apart, would both land inches away from the only ones in sight and they would be in the same positions relative to the spacecraft? It makes much more sense that it’s a piece of the lander designed to break off during the deployment of one of the scientific instruments,” Hill told Life’s Little Mysteries.

NASA said the half-circle components are camera lens covers that popped off the Venera probes after they landed.

For other objects in the images that Ksanfomaliti said were alien, Hill says they are the result of “letting your mind see patterns in low-resolution data that simply aren’t real.”

On the Net:


Source: RedOrbit Staff & Wire Reports



comments powered by Disqus