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Tropical Storm Yagi Spinning In Western Pacific Ocean Seen By NASA

June 11, 2013
Imaeg Caption: NASA’s TRMM satellite captured the rate rain was falling within Tropical Storm Yagi on June 10 at 8:19 a.m. EDT. The heaviest rain was falling around the center of circulation at as much as 1.2 inches per hour. TRMM data was overlaid on infrared cloud imagery from the MTSAT-2 satellite. Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA

Tropical Storm Yagi developed over the weekend of June 8 and 9 in the Western North Pacific from Tropical Depression 03W and NASA satellites captured the storm coming together. NASA´s TRMM satellite measured rainfall rates within the storm and found the heaviest rain falling mostly south of the center.

NASA and the Japanese Space Agency´s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite captured the rate rain was falling within Tropical Storm Yagi on June 10 at 8:19 a.m. EDT. The heaviest rain was falling south of the center around the center of circulation at as much as 1.2 inches (30.4 mm) per hour.

On June 10, 2013 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Yagi had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph), which is expected to be its peak wind speed. Yagi was located near 25.0 north and 135.2 east, about 344 nautical miles (396 miles/ 637.1 km) west of Iwo Jima, Japan. Yagi is moving to the northeast at 12 knots (13.8 mph/22.2 kph).

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, animated infrared imagery reveals a tightly wrapped low-level circulation center that is surrounded by shallow convection. Strong convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms) appears limited in the tropical storm.

To the north of Yagi, vertical wind shear is moderate (between 15 and 20 knots/17.2 and 23.0/ 27.7 and 37.0 kph), and wind shear inhibits development of thunderstorms. Wind shear is a measure of how the speed and direction of winds change with altitude. Water vapor imagery shows that there is sinking air (subsidence) along the western edge of the storm, which is also inhibiting the development of thunderstorms.

Sea surface temperatures remain warm enough to support Yagi, so the storm is expected to maintain strength for the next 24 hours as it moves northeast. Yagi is expected to dissipate south of Japan sometime before June 14.

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Source: Rob Gutro, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center



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