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Heavy Rain Continues In Tropical Cyclone Amara

December 20, 2013
Image Caption: This image of Amara combines TRMM satellite rainfall data and clouds from Japan's METEO-7 satellite on Dec. 19. Heaviest rain was southeast of the center at 1.6 inches per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA/NRL

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s TRMM satellite saw heavy rainfall was happening in Tropical Cyclone Amara on December 16, and still occurring on December 19, although it moved from east to southeast. Warnings are already in effect for Mauritius’ Rodrigues Island.

NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite can measure rainfall rates from space, and that’s what it has been doing over Tropical Cyclone Amara since it was born. On Dec. 16, at 2043 UTC/3:43 p.m. EST TRMM data showed scattered bands of moderate to heavy rain falling at a rate of over 76.9 mm/3 inches per hour spiraling into Amara’s center. Cloud tops reached 13 km/8 miles high near the center and eastern side.

On Dec. 19 at 0441 UTC, the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. combined TRMM satellite rainfall data with a visible image of Amara’s clouds from Japan’s METEO-7 satellite to provide a complete picture of the storm. The image revealed that the heaviest rain was falling southeast of the center at 1.6 inches/40 mm per hour.

By 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone Amara’s maximum sustained winds were near 105 knots/120.8 mph/194.5 kph, making it hurricane-strength. Amara was still about 740 nautical miles east-northeast of La Reunion Island, centered near 17.2 south latitude and 68.3 east longitude.

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Source: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



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