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NASA And Honeywell Launch 2009 FMA Live! Spring Tour

March 10, 2009

NASA and Honeywell are kicking off the Spring 2009 tour of their award-winning science education program FMA LIVE!

This innovative, traveling hip-hop science concert will reach more than 17,000 middle-school aged students during its 10-week, 20 city tour of the United States. Named for Sir Isaac Newtons’s second law of motion (force = mass x acceleration) FMA Live! uses professional actors, original songs, music videos and interactive science demonstrations to teach middle school students Newton’s three laws of motion and universal law of gravity.

Created in 2004, FMA Live! is a collaboration between NASA and Honeywell International of Morristown, N.J. It is the only nationally touring, multi-media, science-education production of its kind.

“Our nation’s future scientists, engineers and explorers are in middle school classrooms today,” said Joyce Winterton, NASA’s assistant administrator for Education. “The NASA Honeywell innovative partnership, represented by the FMA Live! production and its 2009 tour, makes science, technology, engineering and mathematics relevant to students. FMA Live!’s dynamic performers capture the attention of students and inspires them to learn, work hard in school and prepare for science and engineering careers.”

During each FMA Live! performance, students, teachers and school administrators interact with three professional actors in front of a live audience to experience Newton’s laws firsthand. A giant sticky wall is used to demonstrate inertia; go-carts driven across the stage illustrate action and reaction; and “extreme” wrestling and a huge soccer ball show that force is determined by mass multiplied by acceleration.

All three of Newton’s laws are demonstrated simultaneously when a futuristic hover chair collides with a gigantic cream pie.

“Science and math education are top priorities for Honeywell and NASA,” said Tom Buckmaster, president of Honeywell Hometown Solutions. “With FMA Live! we help students learn about science and math in a fun and engaging way and inspire them to become the next generation of engineers and scientists.”

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