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Claudette and Ana Now Disorganized on GOES Satellite Imagery

August 18, 2009

Satellite imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-12 shows clearly that both former Tropical Storms Claudette and Ana are now disorganized and are moving on.

Ana’s life has been a struggle since its beginnings as tropical depression Two. Late on August 17, it really started to fall apart. Today, August 18, the remnants of Ana are in the form of disorganized showers and thunderstorms that stretch from Haiti, across eastern Cuba to southeastern and central Bahamas. That cluster of storms is moving west between 20-25 mph. The showers and thunderstorms associated with Ana’s remnant will cover all of Cuba, move into south Florida and the Bahamas. There’s still a chance it could all come together again and be reborn as Ana, but it’s less than 30 percent right now.

Claudette made a much more memorable impression, particularly over the Florida Panhandle, southern Alabama and Mississippi. NOAA’s National Hydrometeorological Prediction Center noted that the precipitation associated with Claudette’s remnants have diminished now that it’s over the southeastern U.S. They note “showers and thunderstorms may develop and produce isolated heavier amounts across the southeastern U.S. [today, August 18].” Surface observations and satellite imagery don’t even detect any surface circulation, so Claudette has truly dissipated.

The latest NOAA’s GOES-12 satellite imagery doesn’t show any circulation from what was once Claudette over Mississippi or Alabama. In fact, it appears that what’s left of her clouds stretch from Mississippi up the Appalachian Mountain range. The image, taken on August 18 at 7:31 a.m. EDT (1131 UTC) was created by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Claudette didn’t go without leaving a very wet mark, however. From the National Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, here are some rainfall totals through 10 p.m. EDT, August 17:

…FLORIDA…

4.62 – MILLIGAN
4.49 – CRESTVIEW 1.9 SE
3.90 – PORT ST. JOE 0.6 SE
3.69 – APALACHICOLA MUNI ARPT
2.67 – MIRAMAR BEACH 9.5 ESE
2.42 – TYNDALL AFB/PANAMA CITY
2.15 – PANAMA CITY/BAY CO. ARPT
2.04 – NICEVILLE 3.4 ESE
1.90 – CALLAWAY 0.3 W
1.82 – BAKER 8.2 NE

…ALABAMA…

2.11 – BRADLEY
1.21 – MOBILE DOWNTOWN ARPT

…GEORGIA…

2.37 – FORT BENNING -COLUMBUS
1.95 – COLUMBUS METRO ARPT

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Image 1: The latest NOAA’s GOES-12 satellite imagery from August 18 at 7:31 a.m. EDT doesn’t show any circulation from what was once Claudette over Mississippi or Alabama. In fact, it appears that what’s left of her clouds stretch from Mississippi up the Appalachian Mountain range. Credit: NASA GOES Project

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