Quantcast

Cosmonaut Leonid Kizim Passes Away At 68

June 17, 2010

According to Russia’s Federal Space Agency, cosmonaut Leonid Kizim died on Monday at the age of 68.

Kizim, a veteran of two earlier space flights, was born on August 5, 1941 in Krasnyi Lyman in the Ukraine.  He graduated as a pilot in 1963 from the Chernigov Lenin Komsomol Higher Air Force and flew as a test pilot and parachutist before becoming a cosmonaut.

In 1969 he served on the support crews for the joint missions of Soyuz 6,7 and 8. 

He flew with crewmate Vladimir Solovyov on the Soyuz T-10 mission in 1984.

Kizim became the first person to log a full year in space on July 3, 1986 after the Soyuz T-15 mission.  During that mission he and Solovyov met up with the Mir outpost and performed a pair of spacewalks, retrieved experiments that were left by previous crewmembers and tested the deployment and retraction of a 50-foot “girder constructor” device.

Kizim had a total of 374 days, 17 hours and 56 minutes in space.  He served the Russian Ministry of Defense’s satellite control center as the deputy director until 1995 after leaving the space program.  He then became the director of the Military Engineering Academy of Aeronautics and Astronautics in St. Petersburg, a position held until he retired in 2001.

Colonel General Kizim left his wife Galina and their two children behind upon his passing.

On the Net:




comments powered by Disqus