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Space News Archive - November 07, 2011

Space as a key sector for Europe and its citizens will be the subject of a conference that will be held on 8 & 9 November at the Hemicycle of the European Parliament.

Launch Date Confirmed For PromISSe Mission To Space Station

ESA’s next mission to the International Space Station will be launched on 21 December: André Kuipers will ride into orbit aboard the Soyuz TMA-03M spacecraft as a member of the orbital outpost’s Expedition 30.

Voyager 2 Set To Switch To Backup Thruster Set

NASA's Deep Space Network personnel sent commands to the Voyager 2 spacecraft Nov. 4 to switch to the backup set of thrusters that controls the roll of the spacecraft.

International Rendezvous In Lucca On Global Space Exploration

Discussions will focus on space exploration when ministers and heads of agencies of most of the world’s space-faring countries rendezvous on Thursday in Lucca, Italy.

Researchers Say Nonterrestrial Artifacts Are Hard To Pin Down

Two Pioneer probes left our solar system carrying plaques about humankind, and two Voyager probes will soon join them to gather information about places far out in our galaxy.

Government Says It Has No Evidence Of Alien Life

The U.S. government, responding to a petition that accused the government of covering up contact with life beyond Earth, made an official statement on Monday, officially denying knowledge of alien life.

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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