Quantcast

Space News Archive - May 12, 2011

7e58f09c2072cdc31bfeda5a39828e54

Salinity – the concentration of salt – on the ocean surface is a key missing puzzle piece in satellite studies of Earth that will improve our understanding of how the ocean and atmosphere are coupled and work in tandem to affect our climate.

82cbf469668b9c40ab2b7ebfbcba9ca1

How do instruments end up on satellites orbiting the Earth?

f07ccd28d099f0e20db7fd0454d8dddb

ESA's CryoSat team working on the Greenland ice sheet has been honored with a visit from a Dutch delegation including HRH Prince of Orange.

392da4747ba35c15bf91002a63250e36

Western Europe's exceptionally dry spring is clear to see in maps generated using data from SMOS.

SpaceX has named Bret Johnsen as Chief Financial Officer, bringing 20 years of financial leadership experience in high-profile, publicly traded companies to SpaceX as it undergoes rapid growth on the back of tremendous technological and market success.

4276fd189a80fac74a1a2d0d51bde8b4

Scientists said on Wednesday the majority of the 500 planets detected around stars besides the Sun appear to spin the same way the star does.

3a38daa7ddda71382d77cb1dca517313

The fifth dwarf planet of the Solar System, Haumea, and at least one of its two satellites, are covered in crystalline water-ice due to the tidal forces between them and the heat of radiogenic elements.

eb4909129617dac70e19eedcd8ff12bb

Hubble’s newest camera has taken an image of galaxy NGC 4214, a galaxy glowing brightly with young stars and gas clouds.

NASA Television will cover the return of three International Space Station crew members and the launch of three new station residents in the coming weeks.

465bd037faa7ea55017413b33ce39563

NASA said on Thursday that its Galileo spacecraft has revealed a subsurface ocean of molten, or partially molten, magma beneath the surface of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io.

Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related