Quantcast

XXX Domains Going On Sale To The Public Today

December 6, 2011

The new controversial domain for porn sites “.xxx” went on sale Tuesday, and over 100,000 websites are expected to go live with it.

The suffix was approved by Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) last year as a “top-level domain” address.  They say that the idea is to more safely organize content that has become common on the Web.

“The Internet is home to a wealth of content, suitable for a wide range of ages and values,” reads a statement on the website of ICM Registry, which is responsible for handing out the new domain names. “The adult entertainment industry has, and always will, account for a large amount of this content and while it is enjoyed by some, it is not suitable, or of interest, to all Internet users.

“Regardless of your views on adult content, it’s here to stay, so let’s be adult about it.”

The group says that creating the suffix with help gives Web users a better understanding about what sort of site they are visiting.

Manwin Licensing and Digital Playground, two of the Internet’s biggest pornography companies, accused ICM Registry of being “anti-competitive” and a “monopoly.”

The two companies said that the decision to create .xxx is flawed and that ICM Registry had abused its position.  They are suing ICANN and have also filed a suit against ICM Registry.

ICM Registry said that the lawsuits are “without merit” and that it plans to defend itself.

The decision by ICM Registry ended a decade-long battle and put the .xxx domain on par with registries like .com and .org.

“It has been 10 years in the coming and today the floodgates are open,” ICM Registry chief executive Stuart Lawley said in a press release. “We would hope that the number of domains sold will more than double very quickly.”

ICM Registry said about 250 million pages of adult content have already been labeled using its system.

Companies and individuals that do not want their name associated with pornography will be able to pay a one-off fee of between $150 and $300.

On the Net:


Source: RedOrbit Staff & Wire Reports



comments powered by Disqus