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UK Kids Fill Their Time With Gadgets

March 15, 2012

A new survey in the UK finds that children spend 58 minutes a day using technology in their home.

The survey, sponsored by Leapfrog, discovered that two-thirds of children now own a camera, gaming or mobile device with six percent of these owning a personal tablet such as an iPad, reports Emma Barnett for The Telegraph.

The survey goes on to note that seventy percent of children regularly play with their parent´s computer while 16 percent of children aged 10 and under actually own their own computer.

They discovered that half of the families surveyed claim they use technology as a means to bringing the family closer together. While a fifth of parents claim their children know more about modern technology and take to the devices more naturally.

Dr. Ian Pearson, a technology futurologist, told Barnett: “With technology becoming such an important part of everyday life and gadgets like the iPad dominating popular culture, this research demonstrates the changing attitudes of parents towards emerging technology trends and increased usage by children.”

With the increased use of technology by children comes an increase in the need for child safety on the internet. Parents still remain concerned about their children´s safety on the internet. Thirty-eight percent of parents, according to the survey, worry that tablets and Kindles may be inappropriate for their child´s age and they worry that their child may access inappropriate content.

Safety on the internet is more than just worrying about predators, the trend of cyber bullying is of parental concern. The survey reports that twenty-six percent of parents are anxious about online grooming and ten percent of parents are concerned about their children becoming victims of cyber bullying. With all this concern about child safety on the internet, though, only thirty-one percent of parents report their children´s technology time is always supervised.


Source: RedOrbit Staff & Wire Reports



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