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Porn Producers Contacting Those Who Illegally Shared Films

June 3, 2012
Image Credit: Photos.com

Customers of a popular UK mobile phone and broadband service providers suspected of illegally sharing pornographic films will be receiving cease-and-desist letters from filmmakers intent on making it clear that the relationship between the two parties was anything but consensual.

According to a BBC News report, Ben Dover Productions will be contacting the owners of 9,124 IP addresses owned by O2 customers that have been linked to illegal downloads. The British High Court approved the text contained in the letters last week, some two months after O2 was ordered to provide the information to the production company.

Officials from the company, which is officially registered as Golden Eye International at Companies House, the UK’s registrar of businesses, told the British news agency that they would be targeting users who had uploaded films to others. Those who “simply downloaded one film” will not be the focus of the investigation at this time.

“In our first letter we seek to find out more information regarding evidence of an infringement of our copyright,” Ben Dover commercial director Julian Becker told the BBC. “Depending on the response to our letters we will then decide our next action.”

“It is understood that recipients will be told what to do to negotiate a settlement, and will be warned that if they do not respond they could be found liable,” the media outlet explained. “They will be given 28 days to reply after the judge said that a 14 day limit requested by Ben Dover was ‘unreasonable’. The firm was also told it could not specify compensation of £700 [about $1,075] but should individually negotiate a settlement sum with each defendant.”

In a statement reprinted by Anh Nguyen of Computerworld UK , O2 said, “We are pleased that the court has taken a robust approach and controlled the tone and content of the letter Golden Eye proposes to send to our customers“¦ We are also pleased that the judge acknowledged the unique position we are in, and agreed that we have approached this issue in a reasonable way.”

Earlier this year, when the court ruled in favor of Ben Dover Productions, the judge ruled that the original letter the company intended to send demanding payment of those guilty of infringement could cause undue stress, as it could be viewed as “an implicit threat of publicity once proceedings have been commenced,” Telegraph Technology Correspondent Christopher Williams wrote on March 27.


Source: RedOrbit Staff & Wire Reports



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