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Xbox 720 Document Pulled Offline By Microsoft Lawyers

June 18, 2012

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com

If anyone was a skeptic on whether the details of Microsoft Xbox 720 game console were accurate, then all skepticism can be put to rest as the actions of the company’s lawyers have confirmed the alleged specs.

Whether the two-year-old document accurately depicts the exactness of the next-generation console remains to be seen, but it does prove the details from 2010 were from Microsoft.

On Saturday, a 56-page document was leaked out that was allegedly about Microsoft’s next video game console, the Xbox 720.

The document gave a picture by words of what features Microsoft planned on introducing with its next generation gaming system.

Just as the buzz started to swirl around the media hubs, Microsoft lawyers took noticed, and took action.

An international law firm called Covington & Burling LLP, which lists Microsoft as a client, had the document removed from the website it was leaked too.

The actions of the lawyers give more weight to the argument that the gaming system the document describes could be what users see once the Xbox 720 is released.

However, one thing still to be noted is that the document was written back in 2010, so although it may give a glimpse into the future of the gaming console, it could still be a rough draft.

According to the document, Microsoft is planning on releasing the Xbox 720 console for the 2013 holidays with a price point of $299.

It also claimed that the new gaming console would have a Blu-ray player, augmented reality glasses, Kinect version 2, and SmartGlass.

The glasses described in the document would be capable of producing augmented reality environments, and be able to be used apart from the console, assuming all facts in the 2010 document prove to be accurate.

The Xbox 720, according to the details in the document, would be supporting true 1080p output, with full 3D support. It would also feature an “always on” state, which ensures the gaming console doesn’t have to be turned off, but simply “woken up” like a desktop computer in order to be used.

Although questions about the accuracy of the document in relation to what is now in the works remain, the actions by the lawyers shows that the leaked document bugged Microsoft enough to have it taken down.


Source: Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com



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