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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Leading Language-Learning Company Joins Alliance for Linguistic Diversity

June 23, 2012

Transparent Language contributes learning material in support of the Endangered Languages Project powered by Google.

Nashua, NH (PRWEB) June 22, 2012

Transparent Language, Inc., a leading provider of language-learning technology for government, education, corporations, libraries, and consumers, has joined the Alliance for Linguistic Diversity in support of the Endangered Languages Project. The Endangered Languages Project is a website for people to find and share the most up-to-date and comprehensive information about endangered languages. It gives those interested in preserving the history of language a place to store and access research, to share advice, and to build collaborations.

As part of its contributions to the Endangered Languages Project, Transparent Language, together with Grassroots Indigenous Multimedia, has produced a series of instructional videos for the Ojibwe language. The company has also contributed learning materials for Irish, Tajiki, and Scottish Gaelic languages. Transparent Language plans to contribute more linguistic materials and technology to aid the documentation, preservation, and instruction of endangered languages.

Transparent Language has actively supported language preservation projects through its Heritage and Endangered Language Preservation (HELP) Program. The company is committed to adding languages to the available resources in its learning programs, regardless of how remote or active the language may be. CEO Michael Quinlan puts it this way: “We live in an age of global interaction. No language is so small that no one needs to learn it. If we could, we would provide learning programs for all 7,000 languages in the world.

While Transparent Language is a commercial company that needs to earn a profit, we also try our best to give something back to the language community,” adds Quinlan. “When an appropriate representative of a language community reaches out to us, we try to work with that person and their organization. The Endangered Languages Project is a natural association for us.”

To learn more about the Transparent Language Heritage and Endangered Languages Preservation Program, visit http://www.transparent.com/about/endangered-languages.html.

To learn more about the Endangered Languages Project, visit http://www.endangeredlanguages.com.

About Transparent Language, Inc.

America plays a prominent role in world affairs, and yet our longstanding English-centricity has left us weaker than we should be in our ability to communicate globally. At Transparent Language, we attempt to correct this problem by developing language-learning resources and systems that deliver more rapid, reliable, and engaging language learning to those who need language skills for work or school, as well as those who simply find joy in learning and using other languages. Each day we use our expertise in the research and practice of language learning to build programs that are licensed for use by all personnel of Foreign Service Institute, Defense Language Institute, US Special Operations Command, US Marine Corps, US Navy, and many other government organizations, as well as by thousands of schools, hundreds of public libraries, and millions of individual users.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/6/prweb9629713.htm


Source: prweb