Quantcast
Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Netflix, Instagram, Pinterest Service Disrupted By Severe Storms

July 1, 2012
Image Credit: Photos.com

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online

Severe thunderstorms in the eastern part of the United States forced several prominent websites offline and adversely affected others Friday night into Saturday, according to various media reports this weekend.

According to John Letzing of the Wall Street Journal, electrical storms in Virginia disrupted power for Amazon.com’s cloud-computing operations on the evening of June 29.

The disruptions at the database and web services center in that state began at approximately 11:21pm EDT Friday night, which in turn led to issues at several clients using Amazon’s services, including video streaming service Netflix, photo-sharing network Instagram, and social media website Pinterest.

As of Saturday afternoon, Amazon was still reporting performance issues for the Virginia-based cloud computing service center, Letzing said. He added that Netflix and Pinterest were apparently both “up and running” as of Saturday morning, but that Instagram was still “experiencing issues.” An Instagram representative told the Wall Street Journal, “our team of engineers is working hard to restore service.”

The three websites affected turned to Twitter and Facebook in order to communicate with their customers during the outages, the Associated Press (AP) reported on Saturday. Netflix tweeted that customers should reconnect if they experienced continued problems, while Pinterest said that employees were hard at work to fix remaining issues.

Of particular interest to some, including CNET‘s Chris Matyszczyk, is the reaction of the users and subscribers of these services to the outages. “Within minutes,” he said, “panic ensued” and “Netflix, Pinterest and Instagram were anointed with the tweets of the annoyed,” forced to attempt to “placate the enraged.”

“At least these companies — only one of which actually takes money from its faithful — can blame Amazon and whoever it is who creates weather,” Matyszczyk added. “Whom, though, can the people claiming not to be able to live without picture-posting and product-pinning blame?”

In all seriousness, though, the severe storms were responsible for the deaths of six people and knocked out power for hundreds of thousands of residents in the Mid-Atlantic region, the AP added.


Source: redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online