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Facebook Dispels Rumors That Private Messages Were Posted To Public Timelines

September 25, 2012
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redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online

Facebook denied rumors on Monday that users´ private messages had appeared on public Timelines, following a flood of complaints from members who said their old private messages written in 2009 and earlier had been re-published publicly as messages “posted by friends.”

“Every report we´ve seen, we´ve gone back and checked. We haven´t seen one report that´s been confirmed [of a private message being exposed],” Facebook told TechCrunch reporter Colleen Taylor .

“A lot of the confusion is because before 2009 there were no likes and no comments on wall posts. People went back and forth with wall posts instead of having a conversation [in the comments of single wall post].”

“Facebook is satisfied that there has been no breach of user privacy,” the company told BBC News.

A separate Facebook source told BBC that the company´s engineers said there was “no way” the two areas of data could get mixed up because the systems are entirely separate.

There is “no mechanism” that has ever been created that would allow a private message to be published onto a user’s wall or timeline, the source said.

Meanwhile, shares of Facebook´s stock fell under growing pressure on Monday after Barron´s magazine said the stock may be worth as little as $15 a share — well below its $38-per-share IPO price.

“Facebook’s 40% plunge from its initial public offering price of $38 in May has millions of investors asking a single question: Is the stock a buy?” Barron´s said.

“The short answer is ‘No.’”

“What are the shares worth? Perhaps only $15. That would be roughly 24 times projected 2013 profit and six times estimated 2013 revenue of $6 billion, still no bargain price.”

Shares of Facebook´s fell 9.1% on Monday, closing at $20.79 after having fallen more than 11% earlier in the day.


Source: redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online



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