Quantcast

Will Worker’s Right to Know Act Help Struggling Workforce? Kiley Law Group Massachusetts Employment Law Attorneys Say Yes

February 8, 2013

Due to the limited number of jobs available, many U.S. citizens have survived by taking temporary work positions with little to no security and costly employer charges deducted from their paychecks. On January 31, 2013 Massachusetts´ Temporary Workers Right to Know Act went into effect and may provide the relief that many have been hoping for.

(PRWEB) February 08, 2013

Due to the limited number of jobs available, many U.S. citizens have survived by taking temporary work positions with little to no security and costly employer charges deducted from their paychecks. On January 31, 2013 Massachusetts´ Temporary Workers Right to Know Act went into effect and may provide the relief that many have been hoping for.

The act, passed on July 30, 2012 and signed into law on August 6, 2012, allows temporary workers protection in a number of areas. Previously, temp workers may not have received important basic information about their position and were charged questionable fees and costs to work. Now, staffing agencies are required to provide important basic information about a temporary employee´s job and fees will be better regulated.

Under the Temporary Workers Right to Know Act, employers are now required to inform their temp employees as to when their designated pay day is, their actual hourly rate of pay, overtime compensation, type of job, and any training requirements. These might seem standard to full-time workers, but to those who have been living from one temp job to the next, these new requirements could make life a lot easier.

Tom Kiley Sr., wage and hour attorney, has assisted several people who have been mistreated by their employers. “The Temporary Workers Right to Know Act gives Massachusetts employees a fighting chance. Too often, employers take advantage of their temp employees knowing that they will only be with them for a short period of time. These new requirements should have been put in place a long time ago.

“No one deserves to wonder when there work day will start and end or whether their employer will deduct unknown costs from their paychecks. These are exactly the types of acts that would now be considered violations,” said attorney Kiley.

The act specifically prohibits employers from charging their employees for the cost of procuring a job, registering with the state, or a CORI request. In addition, Massachusetts employers are also no longer allowed to institute fees and costs that may decrease a worker´s pay to below the state´s minimum wage.

About Kiley Law Group, LLC

Kiley Law Group, LLC is an employment law firm based in Andover, Massachusetts. Tom Kiley Sr., firm partner, has assisted several victims of employer greed and has worked tirelessly to provide every client with superior representation. Their firm assists those who need legal guidance pertaining to wage and hour, deceptive business practices, and general employment violations.

If you are in need of legal guidance, call (888) 208-1695 to receive a free professional consultation from an experienced legal professional.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prwebtemporary-workers/right-know/prweb10408649.htm


Source: prweb



comments powered by Disqus