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New Yaz, Yasmin Blood-Clotting Lawsuits Allegations Update: Resource4thePeople Reports Health Canada Reports 23 Deaths Among Contraceptive Users

June 14, 2013

Cases involving blood-clotting allegations continue to progress in United States and Canada as Resource4thePeople attorneys offer free legal consultations to U.S. consumers. American cases are consolidated in federal courts over allegations that the use of the popular contraceptives caused life-threatening blood clots.

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) June 14, 2013

http://www.resource4thepeople.com/defectivedrugs/yasmin.html

Resource4thePeople is updating consumers interested in birth control litigation today with news from Canada where national media are reporting that 23 women who used the popular oral contraceptives Yaz and Yasmin have died, mostly from blood clots.*

In a June 12, 2013 posting,* the Canadian Broadcasting Company said that “According to documents obtained from Health Canada, doctors and pharmacists say Yaz and Yasmin are suspected in the deaths of the women, who mostly died suddenly from blood clots.”

Health Canada is the Canadian equivalent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which, on April 10, 2012, issued a Health Warning informing consumers and physicians about possible Yaz and Yasmin blood clotting side effects.**

“This news comes shortly after a Canadian judge certified*** a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of women who are making allegations that Yaz and Yasmin can cause life-threatening blood clots,” said Resource4thePeople.

“In the meantime there has been similar litigation**** ongoing in the United States in which Bayer Pharmaceuticals is defending itself against similar allegations in a multidistrict litigation that now includes thousands of plaintiffs, according to the court docket.”

Resource4thePeople said it will continue to provide U.S. and Canadian consumers with timely updates about the progress of this litigation and its American network of attorneys will continue to provide free consultations to consumers who are alleging blood-clotting problems from the use of these birth control pills.

“This has now become an international litigation involving claims that women have died or suffered life-threatening side effects from the use of these contraceptives,” said Resource4thePeople.

In the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation posting it was reported that “While Bayer has already paid more than $1 billion to settle thousands of lawsuits in the U.S., the drug company tells CBC News it stands by its products.”

The CBC also reported in its posting that “According to the documents obtained from Health Canada, between 2007 and February 2013, doctors and pharmacists have reported 600 adverse reactions and 23 deaths where Yaz or Yasmin were suspected. More than half of the reported deaths were women under 26, with the youngest age 14.”

The Canadian class-action case was certified by Justice Crane of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in a Yaz and Yasmin class action that contains similar allegations to those contained in American lawsuits consolidated in the multidistrict litigation before a federal judge in Illinois.

Bayer has confirmed its Feb. 28, 2013 annual report***** that many of the U.S. cases are in the process of being settled.

“As these cases are being settled we are receiving inquires from consumers about whether there may be an approaching deadline affecting their ability to join in this litigation,” said Resource4thePeople.

“In response to these inquiries we are informing consumers that our national network of consumers will continue to offer free legal consultations to women who used Yaz or Yasmin and have allegedly suffered serious blood-clotting problems.”

Bayer detailed in its annual report that it has settled about 4,800 of these lawsuits for over $1 billion and that there are over 13,000 claimants still seeking damages over side effects.

“As of February 12, 2013, Bayer had reached agreements, without admission of liability, to settle the claims of approximately 4,800 claimants in the U.S. for a total amount of about US$1 billion,” according to the annual report.

Bayer also has agreed****** to pay up to $24 million to settle other lawsuits involving allegations over gall bladder side effects, according to the court files in the litigation.

These settlements are a different part of this consolidated litigation in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois in which plaintiffs claimed that they suffered gall bladder injuries because they used Yaz and Yasmin as contraceptives.**

Reuters News Service reported****** March 20, 2013 that the settlements also include Yaz and Yasmin cases in state courts in California, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

“Under the agreement, Bayer will pay $2,000 to plaintiffs who suffered gallbladder injuries and $3,000 to individuals who had their gallbladders removed, according to the agreement,” Reuters reported.

Women who have filed Yaz and Yasmin blood-clotting lawsuits have claimed that they suffered blood clots, deep vein thrombosis, strokes and pulmonary embolisms as a result of their use of the contraceptives according to allegations contained in their lawsuits.****

The April 10, 2012 Food and Drug Administration warning** about Yaz and Yasmin blood-clotting side effects mirrored these allegations:

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has completed its review of recent observational (epidemiologic) studies regarding the risk of blood clots in women taking drospirenone-containing birth control pills. Drospirenone is a synthetic version of the female hormone, progesterone, also referred to as a progestin. Based on this review, FDA has concluded that drospirenone-containing birth control pills may be associated with a higher risk for blood clots than other progestin-containing pills.”

The FDA also said that “The revised drug labels (Beyaz, Safyral, Yasmin and Yaz) will report that some epidemiologic studies reported as high as a three-fold increase in the risk of blood clots for drospirenone-containing products when compared to products containing levonorgestrel or some other progestins, whereas other epidemiological studies found no additional risk of blood clots with drospirenone-containing products. The labels also will include a summary of the previously released results of an FDA-funded study of the blood clot risk.”

Sources:

*http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/06/11/birth-control-pills-yaz-yasmin.html

**http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm299305.htm

***Case # 52030110, Ontario Superior Court of Justice, St. Catherine’s, Ontario, Canada

**** In re: Yasmin and Yaz (Drospirenone) Marketing, Sales Practices and Products Liability Litigation MDL No. 2100, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Illinois

*****http://www.annualreport2012.bayer.com/en/legal-risks.aspx

******http://newsandinsight.thomsonreuters.com/Legal/News/2013/03_-_March/Bayer_agrees_to_settle_Yasmin,_Yaz_gallbladder_lawsuits/

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/6/prweb10829396.htm


Source: prweb