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Dental Health May Be the Secret to Overall Health

June 24, 2013

Gum Disease Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes, Stroke, and Preterm Births

(PRWEB) June 24, 2013

Forget diet and exercise – one of the biggest secrets to good health is right in your mouth. New research shows that healthy teeth aren’t just important for first impressions, but they can have a lasting impact on your health. A new study says that brushing and flossing are simple ways to prevent – and improve – your heart health, diabetes and other lasting conditions.

According to a May 2013 study by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, dental health is a considerable challenge nationwide. In 2010, approximately 21 percent of adults aged 65 and over had no natural teeth. Women had a slightly higher rate of edentulism (25 percent) than males (17 percent). Of those aged 65 and over with natural teeth, nearly half (47 percent) wore dentures.

Without proper dental care, the study states people are at high risk for gum disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis, which is an irreversible stage of gingivitis where the body breaks down the bone and tissue in the infected area of the mouth, usually resulting in tooth and bone loss.

Signs of Gum Disease

The most obvious signs of gum disease are:

  • Bleeding or swollen gums
  • Bad breath
  • Mobility of teeth
  • Tooth sensitivity
  • Abscessed teeth
  • Tooth loss

Long-term Health Risks

Without treating gum disease, you may be putting your body at risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and preterm birth.

According to the American Centers for Disease Control, studies suggest that gingivitis may increase the risk of conditions such as heart disease and stroke because of the higher levels of bacteria that are found in the body.

A study done by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research found a direct association between cardiovascular disease and periodontal bacteria.

The study was performed by collecting dental samples from 657 older adults and they were all checked for 11 different types of oral bacteria, including 4 specific varieties of bacteria that are thought to cause periodontal disease.

“These same four bacteria were there, they were always there in the analysis, and the relationship seems to be pretty much, with one exception, limited to them,” says Moïse Desvarieux, M. D., Ph. D., the study’s lead author and an infectious disease epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and the University of Minnesota.

Prevention

By scheduling regular dental checkups you’ll be able to stay on top of any dental health issues if they arise. The dentists, hygienist and staff at Glebe Dental Group are highly trained to work with you and ensure the best long-term health for your teeth.

Having healthy teeth and gums is vital to your overall health, and a beautiful smile goes a long way toward making you feel and look your best. Our principal dentists at Glebe Dental Group, Dr. Andrew Lee and Dr. George Lee, understand this and along with the rest of our team, are able to employ the most advanced treatment methods to handle even your most complex dental concerns.

Our practice prides itself on providing cosmetic and complex restorative dentistry services including dental implants, TMJ treatment, full smile makeovers and much more. As a full-service practice, we ensure our patients’ ongoing dental health, providing general dental care services including dental cleanings, teeth fillings and children’s dentistry.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/Glebe-Dental-Group/Sydney-Dental-Implants/prweb10862756.htm


Source: prweb