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Apple To Allow Students Under 13 To Have iTunes Accounts

August 4, 2013

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online

As part of their ongoing initiative to promote the iPad as an educational tool, Apple has announced changes to iTunes’ terms and conditions to allow students under the age of 13 to have their own account – provided the Apple ID was requested by an “approved educational institution.”

According to Martyn Williams of IDG News Service, the policy changes were made on Thursday and are being accompanied by new mobile device management (MDM) options that will allow teachers to exercise greater control over how their students use their tablet computers during school hours.

“They will be able to control app setup, access to documents or printing, and account changes,” he wrote. “They’ll also be able to stop children from switching to different apps during lesson time, so they won’t be able to sneak a game of ‘Angry Birds’ when they’re supposed to be studying geography.”

“The MDM protocol is part of iOS 7, the upcoming version of Apple’s operating-system software for the iPhone and iPad. Apple hasn’t announced a launch date for the software beyond the ‘fall’ in North America,” he added.

The conditions also apply to the App Store, iBookstore and Mac App Store, explained Apple Insider‘s Mikey Campbell, but cautions that iOS users over the age of 13 but under the age of 18 should review the agreement with the parents and/or guardians before registering for an account.

Furthermore, in order for schools to request an Apple ID for younger pupils, they must first request and be granted parental consent, Campbell said. In June, Apple secured a contract to supply students at the Los Angeles Unified School District – the second largest school district in the US – with iPads. That deal was worth a reported $30 million dollars, the Apple Insider writer added.

While the Cupertino, California-based tech giant said that students will not be required to have an Apple ID to utilize iPads for educational purposes, it would make for a superior learning experience and would allow them to be part of a new volume licensing program due out later this year, said Williams.


Source: redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online



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