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Novus Medical Detox Comments on Possible Uprising of Deadly Narcotic, Calls for Public Education

December 23, 2013

As the Russian import and heroin knock-off known as “Krokodil” begins making its rounds in the U.S., Novus Medical Detox says the only way to fight a possible epidemic is by educating the public about the dangers of the flesh-eating drug and its fellow opiates.

New Port Richey, FL (PRWEB) December 23, 2013

While prescription drugs have taken the U.S. by storm in recent years, a new narcotic has recently been cropping up—“Krokodil” is a cheap, homemade opiate in the same family as heroin that causes the skin to rot away when injected (1). As the drug is making its debut in several states, Novus Medical Detox, one of the only Florida-based detox centers serving high-dosage drug abuse patients, says the addictive qualities and deadly side effects of Krokodil could spawn a drug wave that the U.S. is unprepared for; as a result, Novus encourages increased education about the dangers of opiates.

Despite the apparent toxic consequences of Krokodil, Novus officials say that the substance is highly likely to be desired by those struggling with drug addiction due to its faster onset, shorter duration of high and higher potency than heroin. As opiates are considered to be especially addictive because they directly influence the reward center of the brain, Novus Executive Director Kent Runyon says that the appearance of this substance could attract users, including first-time drug users.

Krokodil, which means “crocodile” in Russian and is named for the scaly appearance of skin once gangrene sets in, originated in Russia as a cheap solution to a heroin shortage; it is also known as desomorphine, a drug patented in the ’30s and marketed in Switzerland under the brand name Permonid (2). However, an important distinction is that desomorphine itself does not cause the damage associated with Krokodil—the hazards posed by Krokodil stem from the caustic substances that amateur chemists fail to remove before injection (3). Krokodil is made from over-the-counter codeine-based headache pills mixed with iodine, gasoline, paint thinner or alcohol—when injected, it destroys the body’s tissue, causing festering sores, blood poisoning and the user’s skin to turn scabby and green like a crocodile (4).

Runyon encourages public education about the dangers of such opiates to avoid the usage of Krokodil and similar substances. Runyon also maintains that detox and rehabilitation programs should not only help the patient return to a life of sobriety, but also focus on the emotional issues that made the person turn to drugs in the first place. Otherwise, per Runyon, many recovering substance abusers will likely relapse.

“Arguably, the most important part of a recovery program is discerning the underlying problem that’s causing the addiction and addressing it—you can’t simply treat symptoms when looking to help someone achieve long-term sobriety,” said Runyon. “There is potential for many more cases of Krokodil use, and the first step in stopping this is to alert and educate the public of its existence—we have to sound the alarm before it’s too late.”

Novus opened its doors with the purpose of fixing the detox process to ensure that anyone could overcome addiction comfortably. The detox center handles the toughest of drug and alcohol cases, many of which are rejected from other facilities as “too high a risk.”

Historically, the detox process has been a one-size-fits-all system where some were able to tough it out, but many were not. Novus’ proprietary I.V. vitamin cocktail is tailored to each individual’s needs to replenish nutrients lost during drug abuse, allowing them to treat high-dose patients with minimal pain. By paying particular attention to strengthening patients’ bodies during the detox process via proprietary medical protocols, medical staff members at Novus say that this aspect is the difference between detox being “too painful to confront” and people successfully getting their lives back.

Novus advises those who are dependent on any abusive substance(s) to seek out safe, medically-supervised detox programs, and to use those with integrated medicine that allows the detox process to be as comfortable as possible.

To learn more about the Novus Medical Detox center and its addiction and detox programs, visit http://www.NovusDetox.com.

About Novus Medical Detox Center:

Novus Medical Detox Center offers safe, effective alcohol and drug treatment programs in a home-like residential setting. Located on 3.25 tree-lined acres in New Port Richey, Fla., Novus is licensed by the Florida Department of Children and Families as an inpatient medical detox facility. Novus is known for minimizing the discomfort of withdrawal from prescription medication, drugs or alcohol by creating a customized detox program for each patient, incorporating medication, natural supplements and fluid replenishment—putting the dignity and humanity back into drug detoxification. Patients have 24/7 medical supervision, including round-the-clock nursing care and access to a withdrawal specialist, and enjoy comfortable private or shared rooms with a telephone, television, DVD player and high-speed Internet access. For more information, visit http://www.novusdetox.com.

1.Castillo, Michelle. “Krokodil Use Reportedly Spreading: What Makes Dangerous Drug So Addictive?” Cbsnews.com. CBS Interactive, 22 Oct. 2013. Web. 24 Nov. 2013. cbsnews.com/news/krokodil-use-reportedly-spreading-what-makes-dangerous-drug-so-addictive/.

2.Bellware, Kim. “Krokodil, The Flesh-Eating Street Drug That Rots Skin From Inside-Out.” Huffingtonpost.com. The Huffington Post, 09 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2013. huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/09/krokodil-drug_n_4073417.html.

3.Sullum, Jacob. “Another Way Prohibition Makes People’s Flesh Rot.” Forbes.com. Forbes Magazine, 07 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2013. forbes.com/sites/jacobsullum/2013/10/07/another-way-prohibition-makes-peoples-flesh-rot/.

4.Winter, Michael. “Flesh-rotting ‘krokodil’ Drug Emerges.” Usatoday.com. Gannett, 27 Sept. 2013. Web. 25 Nov. 2013. usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/09/26/heroin-krokodil-flesh-rotting-arrives-us-arizona/2879817/.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11442772.htm


Source: prweb



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