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MAAWG Offers Free Video Training on IPv6 for Senders

February 4, 2011

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — As the world prepares to transition to IPv6, what do legitimate senders and marketers need to know about the updated protocol and how it will affect their operations? The Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) is helping senders find the answers to these questions with a free video “IPv6 for Senders” now available on the MAAWG website.

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While some organizations are already deploying IPv6, most legitimate senders and marketers have not yet made the transition. The MAAWG video demystifies Version 6 for senders who need to understand how the impending industry switch from IPv4 will impact their mailings.

The presentation by Internet security and IPv6 expert Joe St Sauver, Ph.D., a MAAWG senior technical advisor and frequent industry speaker, provides a basic primer to help marketers understand how and when to implement IPv6 email. The approximately hour-long course is available in 20- to 25-minute video segments, including an introduction to basic concepts, an examination of the drivers and myths affecting IPv6 adoption, and a review of technology issues.

Industry professionals can watch the videos at http://www.maawg.org/activities/training/ipv6-video-list or access them from the Activities menu on the MAAWG site at www.maawg.org. The course was originally presented in October 2010 at the organization’s Washington, D.C. general meeting.

“Assisting marketers and volume senders in understanding how and when to make a timely and smooth transition to IPv6 will help keep legitimate email flowing with fewer disruptions as the industry moves to the new protocol. Joe St Sauver is a recognized leader in this field and active in a number of Internet organizations. We are fortunate to be able to share his experience on this subject with senders,” said MAAWG Chairman Michael O’Reirdan.

This is the second video in the MAAWG Training Series that the organization has made available to the industry. A detailed course on DKIM implementation is also available in four parts on the MAAWG site.

About the Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG)

The Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG) is where the messaging industry comes together to work against spam, viruses, denial-of-service attacks and other online exploitation. MAAWG (www.MAAWG.org) represents more than one billion mailboxes from some of the largest network operators worldwide. It is the only organization addressing messaging abuse holistically by systematically engaging all aspects of the problem, including technology, industry collaboration and public policy. MAAWG leverages the depth and experience of its global membership to tackle abuse on existing networks and new emerging services. It also works to educate global policy makers on the technical and operational issues related to online abuse and messaging. Headquartered in San Francisco, Calif., MAAWG is an open forum driven by market needs and supported by major network operators and messaging providers.

Media Contact: Linda Marcus, APR, 714-974-6356, LMarcus@astra.cc, Astra Communications

MAAWG Board of Directors: AOL; AT&T (NYSE: T); Bank of America; Cloudmark, Inc.; Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA); Cox Communications; Eloqua; Facebook; France Telecom (NYSE and Euronext: FTE); Goodmail Systems; Openwave Systems (NASDAQ: OPWV); PayPal; Return Path, Inc.; Tata Communications (NYSE: TCL); Time Warner Cable; Verizon Communications; and Yahoo! Inc.

MAAWG Full Members: 1&1 Internet AG; Antevenio; Apple Inc.; Cisco Systems, Inc.; Constant Contact (CTCT); e-Dialog; Edatis; Email Sender and Provider Coalition; Experian CheetahMail; Genius.com; Internet Initiative Japan, (IIJ NASDAQ: IIJI); McAfee Inc.; Scality; Spamhaus; Sprint; Symantec; Trend Micro, Inc.; YouSendIt; and Zynga, Inc.

A complete member list is available at http://www.maawg.org/about/roster.

SOURCE Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG)


Source: newswire



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