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Technology News Archive - April 25, 2006

Many television programs have a loyal audience that isn't quite sizable enough to justify a commercial DVD release.

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Walt Disney Co. has reached a deal with the Hollywood unions that will put the long-delayed "mobisode" spinoff of hit ABC series "Lost" back on track, the company said Monday

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A Saudi-German plan to launch a dedicated Arabic language search engine for the World Wide Web could revolutionize the moribund Arabic Internet market, a senior official in the project said.

The ABC television network's decision to sell its content online, while angering affiliates, was aimed at preventing piracy from eroding the broadcasting business, a senior network executive said on Tuesday.

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It has two seats, three wheels and so far has cost $2.9 million. Students at the University of Bath in western England, who on Monday unveiled the prototype of the CLEVER (Compact Low Emission Vehicle for Urban Transport), hope that it represents a greener future for transport.

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UA's nanotechnology research group is using proteins from living cells to "grow" wires on microchips.

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Internet users around the world send an estimated 60 billion emails every day and many of these are spam or scam attempts, business leaders said on Tuesday.

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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