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Technology News Archive - August 25, 2009

ARMONK, N.Y., Aug. 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Deutsche Borse Group and IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that Deutsche Borse Group has selected IBM high speed messaging technology to become part of its all new technology infrastructure.

ILTA 2009, WASHINGTON, August 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Autonomy Corporation plc (LSE: AU.

PARIS, August 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Oberthur Technologies, one of the world's leading smart card vendors, announces the successful completion of CUP (China Union Pay) certification for its Shenzhen manufacturing center in China. The Oberthur Technologies Shenzhen manufacturing site is already providing several hundred million SIM cards globally for the Telecom industry, and is now supplying magnetic stripe and EMV cards to banking customers in China and throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

OR-YEHUDA, Israel, Aug. 25 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Magic Software Enterprises Ltd.

MENLO PARK, Calif., and CHICAGO, Aug. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- The economy has posed many challenges for businesses - including the need to make sure they are prepared for the upturn.

HUIZHOU, Guangdong, China, Aug. 25 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- Qiao Xing Universal Telephone, Inc.

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. and ATLANTA, Aug. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Nomadesk, the easiest and most secure on-demand file sharing software, and winner of the 2009 Innovate! Europe's Most Promising Startup Competition in May 2009, launched in the U.S.

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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