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Technology News Archive - January 28, 2010

LONG BEACH, Calif., NEW YORK and DUBAI, United Arab Emirates , Jan. 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Planet Payment, Inc.

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Sony Electronics Inc. is announcing that it has acquired Convergent Media Systems, a leading provider of video integration solutions to the enterprise market.

HSINCHU, Taiwan, Jan. 28 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- AU Optronics Corp. ("AUO" or the "Company") (TAIEX: 2409; NYSE: AUO) today announced unaudited results for 4Q2009 and Fiscal 2009.

TAIPEI, Taiwan, Jan. 28 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- Advanced Semiconductor Engineering, Inc.

OAKLAND, Calif., Jan. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Centrro, Inc., a leading developer of online personal financial services today announced that the company was issued U.S. Patent No. 7,620,597 titled "Online Loan Application System Using Borrower Profile Information" on 11/17/2009.

- Announces Expansion of Successful Partnership with US Airways - Renews a Number of Current Partnerships - Prepares for Launch of New Partners and Products During the First Half of 2010 - Raises 2010 Revenue Guidance to Range of $75 Million to $85 Million - Conference call at 9:00 a.m.

TROY, Mich., Jan. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- In advance of the new Federal Housing Administration regulations which will take effect February 15, 2010, DartAppraisal.com has partnered with eMerchant Inc.

Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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