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Is A Mission To Mars Possible? – With Guest Tim Folger (Part 2)

May 1, 2013
Is A Mission To Mars Possible Podcast
Microphone Image Credit: Dr. Cloud / Shutterstock

John P. Millis, PhD for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online

Will man ever walk on the surface of Mars? While in some ways, a trip to the Red Planet may not seem all that different from a trip to the Moon, the number of factors and contingencies that have to be planned for and calculated are far greater and vastly more complex.

The voyage itself will likely last much longer than any Moon mission, and the dangers due to radiation and a variety of other perils seem almost insurmountable. So could a mission ever be a reality, or do we simply lack the technology to tackle such challenges?

Today I am speaking once again with Tim Folger to discuss the renewed interest in sending astronauts to Mars. We explore the challenges that await both NASA and commercial adventurers as they attempt to make history with a successful trip to the Red Planet. Finally, we discuss perhaps the most pressing and important question of them all: Is a manned mission to Mars worth the cost?

Biography

Tim Folger is contributing editor at Discover magazine and the series editor of The Best American Science and Nature Writing, an annual anthology published by Houghton Mifflin. He has been writing about science and the environment for more than 20 years on subjects ranging from quantum mechanics to tsunamis. In 2007 he won the American institute of Physics science writing award as has also been recipient of Best American Science Writing on numerous occasions. In addition to Discover, his work has appeared in National Geographic, Scientific American, Men’s Health, Science, and other national magazines. When he’s not busy traveling the globe for his next story, he lives in a small town in New Mexico.



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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.