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Latest 17th Street Canal Stories

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2008-10-15 08:50:00

Three years after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, people still speculate over causes of the destruction of the city's floodwall system. A new article in the fall issue of American Entomologist (Vol. 54, No. 3) suggests that Formosan subterranean termites played a large role. Author Gregg Henderson, a professor at the Louisiana State University AgCenter, discovered Formosan subterranean termites (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) in the floodwall seams in August, 2000 "“ five...

2008-09-02 09:00:18

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Waves crashed high against flood walls Monday and New Orleans' rebuilt levee system survived its first hurricane in three years, but Gustav exposed weaknesses the Army Corps of Engineers won't plug any time soon. Gustav was no Katrina. It was smaller, and the worst rain and wind missed New Orleans. Its storm surge -- between 10 and 15 feet lower than Katrina's -- entered New Orleans through navigation channels in the east and washed over the Industrial Canal. The...

2006-07-27 10:02:07

By Peter Henderson NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Flood defenses meant to protect New Orleans from hurricanes could lock rain in the city and put some areas 5 feet under water during a tropical storm, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said on Wednesday. The Corps is responsible for rebuilding the city's shield against storms after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans last August, killing 1,336 on the Gulf Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center. The Army released maps on...

2006-05-29 15:08:08

By Jeffrey Jones NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Yvonne Wise recalled many customers of her clothes alteration business as she marched past smashed homes and rusting, overturned cars of New Orleans' Lower Ninth Ward to the joyous sounds of a brass band. Moments before, in New Orleans jazz funeral tradition, the Treme Brass Band's renditions were somber as Wise and dozens of others stood where a levee gave way nine months earlier to the day, sending a torrent through the streets of the Lower...

2006-05-01 07:40:00

By Jeffrey Jones NEW ORLEANS -- As a New Orleans firefighter, Randy Cookmeyer stayed on the job as Hurricane Katrina slammed the city on August 29. It was four days before he could go home, and by then he had to moor a boat to the rain gutter of his garage to retrieve clothes for his two sons. "I climbed up on my roof, cut a hole and got in through the attic because the water was up to the second-floor windows," Cookmeyer said outside his home, three blocks from where the storm surge ripped a...

2006-03-23 17:47:15

By Jeffrey Jones NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Mayor Ray Nagin said on Thursday he is confident that $770 million of levee repairs will protect most of New Orleans this hurricane season, but officials warned another Katrina-strength storm could swamp low-lying areas again. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is racing to meet a June 1 deadline -- the formal start to the hurricane season -- to have the 350 mile levee system protecting New Orleans and the surrounding area back to pre-Katrina...

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2006-01-20 00:50:00

By Ellen Wulfhorst NEW ORLEANS -- Tackling a subject many people in New Orleans might consider a bad joke, experts laid out plans on Thursday to boost the effectiveness of government, much of which collapsed in the chaos of Hurricane Katrina. The proposals, from creating one authority to oversee the critical levee system to consolidating law enforcement, aim to address an array of problems faced by New Orleans in the August 29 storm and aftermath, said members of the panel making...

2005-12-13 15:00:00

NEW ORLEANS -- An initial test of one of New Orleans' broken levees on Tuesday suggested it had been built deep enough to meet design specifications, raising new questions of what caused the system of flood protection to fail during Hurricane Katrina, engineering officials said. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which designed and oversees the system of levees, pulled out several metal sheet pilings from a damaged levee at the city's 17th Street Canal and found their length met design...

2005-11-22 14:45:00

By Janet Guttsman NEW ORLEANS -- A billion-dollar emergency repair project is well under way along the web of levees protecting New Orleans from floods, but future engineering plans are as murky as ever. The issue centers on whether to patch up the system or rebuild it completely so New Orleans can cope with a storm as devastating as Hurricane Katrina, which swept ashore on August 29 and breached the levees in 50 places. "We will have the level of protection back to where it was pre-Katrina...

2005-09-24 10:11:59

By Andy Sullivan NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Surging waters from Hurricane Rita poured into the streets of New Orleans on Saturday and bands of rain posed an additional threat to the devastated, but largely empty, city. Officials expected few deaths in the neighborhoods that flooded on Friday because they had been largely deserted before storm waters topped levees along the Industrial Canal in at least four places. The Army Corps of Engineers said it planned to use a helicopter to drop...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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